This is why I post here (and not on TH)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Octiceps, Jul 14, 2010.

  1. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    I usually try to excercise my finger and stay away from what I refer to as "pissing matches". I've gotten fairly good at recognizing one in the making and excercise my clicker and move on to another post and leave that one alone.............Buck:shhh::oops:
     
  2. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    Will this do?

    [​IMG]
     
    turtlejimmy likes this.
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    :lol:
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    No .... it's better than that ..... it's a KNOCKDOWN.

    ROFL
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    There are a lot of interesting aspects to any online discussion concerning musical equipment and there are a lot of armchair experts who have never really gigged and can't play their way out of a wet paper bag.

    I was once involved in a discussion with a fellow where we were checking out each other's trumpets and talking shop, and he made a comment about a horn and how with the squared tuning slide he felt it just played too stuffy.

    ???

    To explain a bit on that, this guy had such an underdeveloped tone - really diffuse and airy - no range, no real technique...simply put, even for him to do something simple like playing along to hymns in a church would be a major challenge or even a struggle. However, he was totally into the gear aspect of playing the trumpet and it was clear that he had done a lot of reading about various horns and building techniques such as a the difference between the squared tuning slide and a single radius tuning slide, as well as heavy valve caps and that kind of thing.

    I also once played a gig with a young fellow who has some wonderful gear - he had an Anniversary model Strad with all the gold trimmings, custom mouthpieces, a high end reunion blues gig bag, tuners, and other accessories, etc. Later when we were chatting over breakfast (it was for an Easter service) he was telling me about all of these other wonderful horns he owned - C trumpet, picc, flugel, etc.

    This guy was pretty raw as a player, and I found it interesting how much money he had thrown at gear when money thrown at lessons and spending time getting his chops together with a single horn and mouthpiece might have been a better idea. (at the time I had 1 trumpet - a well worn and used ML 37 Strad, and I used 1 mouthpiece to play it)

    Either one of those guys would I'm sure have sounded like experts online. Just a thought.
     
  6. DaveH

    DaveH Piano User

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    Good post above...I think therein has been very well described what is the case with very much of this situation.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Hey! Let's see that rabbit again .... The Turtle wants to challenge him to a race.

    T

    Trickg, I agree with DaveH, good post. If everyone HAD to post a clip of their own playing--before expressing opinions on hardware--I imagine that would cut the overall volume of posts somewhat.
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Keep in mind that I'm in no way implying any kind of greatness on my part - I'm as much of a hack as anyone else, and although I seem to be able to hack my way into gigging pretty regularly, I always feel like I'm at the low end of the talent spectrum in the groups I play with. These two guys though didn't seem to have a good balance between the talk and the chops.

    Something I find interesting too is that I was once playing a Bach that seemed slightly stuffy and my accuracy was always in question - like the slots were quite right, and all of a sudden I was playing a very well centered Bach and my accuracy was greatly improved.

    Same trumpet, same mouthpiece with NO modifications to the trumpet. What happened? A friend of mine "dialed in" the gap on my mouthpiece by turning the shank down ever so slightly to optimize the gap. It was amazing the difference that it made. Sometimes I think that Bach bashers wouldn't be so quick to bash if they did a similar thing because playing with that trumpet got much easier, and the change was instantaneous.

    I tend to agree with that. I've posted clips here and there and I feel that for the most part they are solid enough, but I'm certain not awesome - that much is certain!
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2010
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Right. It's like, consider the source. It makes a difference. If Alison Balsom, say, made a post in here talking about this or that trumpet for a big, classical sound, even I would sit up and listen (though I mainly want to play jazz).

    Turtle
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Infotainment I think is the answer. If we had a tool to mine the real info here, I am sure that EVERYTHING applicable to the trumpet has been dealt with (and solved) at least once. There are also many "controversial" approaches where we have no real outcome, but also cannot write the concept off.

    The discussions about hardware though show a necessity for many to feel more knowledgable than the instrument designers themselves. Amazingly enough, many of these posters don't even know how a trumpet works. They only address the symptoms in their posts - not the real underlying issues.

    Like being sick, when you treat only the symptoms, you only lose sight of how bad the sickness actually is. Out of this "sick" ignorance, the discussions start, mostly based only on hot air. I believe the only course of action is a "blunt" truth. Many get turned off by this type of style because it appears less respectful than discussing something to death or accepting a "myth" or "lie" as an "opinion". Quite often the frustration of being "uninformed" reduces the argument to a "showdown" demand (you advertise your latest CD versus mine.......). Back to the lowest common denominator - whose studio and audio engineer was better...........

    I am open to comments, but expect those giving them to accept responses. This is not a monologue.

    Help make TM the very best it can be. Post truthfully, respectfully and if you have the gift, a touch of humor often goes a long way to turning geekiness human!
     

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