Thoughts on my daily routine

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Starkly, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I've gigged with Scotty for over a decade, and I know how he built his technique. In his own words, "I locked myself in my room, smoked a lot of...(cigarettes)... and played to a lot of records." He's not classically trained - not by a long shot, but he's still one of the finest musicians I've ever gigged with.

    In any case, I've heard him play hundreds of solos - Scotty is one of these guys who just has a knack for playing fantastic solo lines, and he has fantastic tone in his hands.

    I guess what I was trying to get past was the idea that you had to put in that kind of thought and development, and I disagree that it has to be learned in a technical way. I think for those (like me, perhaps) who don't really "get it" and can't just hear it and make it happen, it's probably a great approach, but that's not where true genius lies.

    I think that's one of the reasons I enjoy playing drums so much - when I'm behind the kit, I'm free of thinking about it in a technical way because although I can read drum charts, if I can help it, I choose not to, and it has helped me to be a more expressive player across the board. Who'da thunk that playing drums would translate in a positive way to the trumpet?

    Dr. Mark....who are you? Master classes? You're obviously much higher up the rungs than this lowly weekend gigging hackster. :D I wonder if maybe I could wade into the intarwebs and get it figured out.
     
  2. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi trickg,
    You asked (in bold)
    Dr. Mark....who are you?
    --
    Well, I'm Dr.Mark or Doc at least that's what students have called me for a long time.
    --
    Master classes?
    ---
    Oh yes!! they're a lot of fun. I like having the students/attendees or people who have paid to attend to improv using these simple rules. It's not hard pending the song is a simple one for example So What or something easy.
    ---
    You're obviously much higher up the rungs than this lowly weekend gigging hackster.
    ---
    Nope, I'm no higher or lower (well...maybe lower if you read my piece on apple cider).
    Dr.Mark
     
  3. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi trickg,
    You stated:
    "I disagree that it has to be learned in a technical way."
    ---
    Oh my, I never said that it did and if I did, I stand corrected. many of the methodologies can be learned by simply listening and playing along. The great thing about learning that way is it's like Ragu, It's already in there. Many people couldn't grab a whole tone scale if there life depended on it but they sure can play the heck out of a Miles Davis solo that has a whole tone scale in it. They learned by sitting in their bedroom, smoking a lot of ..uh..cigarettes and copying what Miles was doing note for note. This is a wonderful way to learn and I wouldn't fault anyone who developed that way. Some (heck most) of my heros probably developed that way. I know I did a lot of development that way.
    Dr.Mark
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey guys, I do not want to be pedantic, but this is the Daily Routine Thread, which naturally could involve some improvisation, although I would probably move that into the practice session instead of the daily routine.

    As far as the classical musician connecting, I offer this: the daily routine plays a big part in "freeing us" by building a stable base. It is equally tough to play with abandon as a classical musician as it is to play in a jazz setting. The rules are only a bit different. The birds eye view has to be from the same angle however. Bud Herseth and Wynton Marsalis share quite a bit as do Manny Laureano and Miles Davis. TMs own Wilmer Wise and Tony Kadlek are successful in multiple venues (as are a multitude of others).

    At "hack level", it is possible that the jazz musician utilizes more soul, but that data is almost impossible to quantify.

    I prefer to define our success by the number of souls that we touch and in this respect, an accomplished high school player develops "their" audience just like a pro does. The classical and jazz musician touch souls in the same way - inspiring the listener to come back for more. I am very glad that I can enjoy performances at the student as well as at the pro level -the musical context being the deciding factor. I am especially moved at the student level when the effects of proper Daily Routine become obvious: relaxed, consistent, good feedback with ones own limits.
     
  5. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi rowuk,
    You stated:
    "Hey guys, I do not want to be pedantic, but this is the Daily Routine Thread, which naturally could involve some improvisation, although I would probably move that into the practice session instead of the daily routine.
    ---
    Sorry rowuk.
    Hi Starkly,
    Let's unring that bell and start anew!
    Your routine seems okay but one of the major things is "how" you are doing the routine.
    There are three documents that can be printed out for free by way of this site. The documents can and will serve you well "IF" you follow the directions. They are:
    1. Circle of Breath
    2. Ray of Power
    3. The Basics Sheet
    These are important documents and have helped scads of people with endurance, range, sound, and a host of other issues
    Good luck and if you have any questions about the documents, feel free to ask!
    Dr.Mark
     
  6. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    This thread is very interesting to me. My teacher really struggled to get me to break the habit of approaching the daily routine as a recipe as outlined from the OP, i.e., so many minutes of this and so much of that, to build technical mastery. Because they way my mind worked, the focus accidentally became physical, technical mastery and not music. Yes, it is great to go through the Clarke studies and other method books. But, to quote my teacher: "no one is ever going to pay to hear you play Clarke studies." So, we moved way from them and use etudes to accomplish the daily "warm-up" and work on technical things within that context. I do love doing lip flexibility exercises because I just recently got the knack of them, but now I can do them within repertoire and make an exercise out of a trouble spot when necessary. Maybe it is a stage that we all have to go through but breaking free from so much technical prescription and focusing on playing music, can facilitate the technically difficult things if the musical mind takes over. Sounds like hocus pocus but it has really helped.

    FYI, the great Johnny Cowell, former principle for the TSO, told me he learned to play (self-taught) and honed is technique by playing solos like he heard on records and the radio.

    BB
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Young people are supposed to be young people - with all the enthusiasm and naiveté that comes with the package. There is no need to try and be "equals" - whatever that would mean. You are valuable for what you are, not what you think that we would like you to be. You can gladly post YOUR FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE and get no heat. When you start trying to explain a working musicians life and practice, you should have been there once. If you haven't been there, you could ask the working musicians how they manage. That is also true if you are a comeback player at 50 or an exceptional 12 year old!

    Young people should not "respectfully learn and ask questions from their "elders.""! They should simply be the best judge of what they personally do and don't know and react accordingly. That is being honest with yourself AND us.
     
  8. Starkly

    Starkly New Friend

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    Can someone please supply me with the links to what Dr. Mark is talking about?
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    There are lots of tips and tricks the community can provide you, Starkly.
     

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