Thoughts on my daily routine

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Starkly, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Jimmy brings up a good point, and it's something that I'm terribly guilty of. As a musician, I'm a gig oriented player - simply put, if I don't have a gig on the immediate horizon, I'm otherwise busy enough that I don't make the time to practice. Fortunately, both as a trumpet player and a drummer, I have enough stuff going that I tend to practice both quite a bit, but my practice isn't structured like the OP's - at least not for the same goals. I built the base of my technique 20ish years ago - these days it's about keeping it honed so that I don't suck when it counts, i.e., on the gig, so my practice is more about maintenance of chops than building of chops.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Dr.Mark, dogging a hero is a good start, but after awhile as technique develops and goals are reached and readdressed, find a new hero then another then another until they are all integrated into the unique techniques you achieved with your goals, then you become your own hero. Took me 40+ years to get there and I am still going there, but about 20+ years of playing is when I developed my own voice and became my own hero. The best teacher ever had, Claudio Roditi, drilled this concept into my lesson plans week after week. He was spot on.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I always believed a brief 5-10 in warm up structure is good. The the next hour of my practice is working on the performance goals for the week (dictated by the gig ahead). This could mean running patterns, getting dexterity under finger for the lines I need to play, or improving over charts to be played in performance for that week. Then ending the next hour playing through The Art of Jazz Trumpet, which are variants of Clark's that is jazzed up. So maybe "routine" is not the active word in my practice technique, but rather a template that adjusts to the goals of the week.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Dogging a hero is a good way to make a good bit of improvement, but there has to come a realization that at the end of the day, the only person you are truly going to sound like is you, regardless of the horn you use, regardless of the mouthpiece you use, etc.

    I once went to a drum clinic where the clinician pulled a handful of random people out of the audience. He had them each play about 30-40 seconds worth of a basic backbeat rock groove - think the groove for "Back In Black" by AC/DC - simple, straight ahead rock groove. They all played it on the same set of drums using the same set of drum sticks and all of them sounded completely different. To further illustrate the point, he sent all but two of them back into the audience, and he kept the two who sounded the most different.

    His point was, you can chase after someone else's sound, and even go so far as to put yourself behind the same equipment, but at the end of the day you needed to get comfortable with your own sound, and put time in to developing that. It's a very valuable lesson IMO, and I came away from that clinic with mindset that I was going to become more confident in my own sound. While this was something I specifically applied to my drumming, it crossed over into my trumpet playing as well.

    This is how I tend to practice these days as well - my playing and practice is almost 100% structured toward what I need to do for the gig.
     
  5. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi trickg,
    You stated:
    "Dogging a hero is a good way to make a good bit of improvement, but there has to come a realization that at the end of the day, the only person you are truly going to sound like is you, regardless of the horn you use, regardless of the mouthpiece you use, etc.
    ---
    Yes and no. The concept of a hero is a situation where the apprentice obsesses. They eat, sleep, and can't wait to grab their horn to play some more of their hero's stuff. Unfortunately(or maybe fortunately if that's what they want), for some, at the end of the day 35 years down the road they still sound like for example Maynard. Don't get me wrong, I think it's neat to listen to someone and you can tell who their heros were but to have a distinct voice is not an easy thing and it is not achieved overnight. Most would say I've got my own sound but let me check. Hey Gman, who do I sound like?
    Dr.Mark
     
  6. Starkly

    Starkly New Friend

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    I'm going to have to disagree with this.

    Having goals is justification for a routine. I have several specific ones right now, including a confident and more extensive upper-range, clearer triple tonguing, less pressure while playing, and more endurance. I'm achieving those by the things I mentioned: quiet chromatics to the top of my range to get used to playing up there without increased pressure, Clarke 4s to try my endurance, double/triple tonguing for the obvious.

    I am, also, routinely playing things such as Stamp, lip bends, long tones, etc. because I always want better tone, accuracy, articulation, intonation. This maintenance calls for these routine things.

    I'm not saying that I'll stick to this routine forever. This is my routine for probably just this summer. As I notice improvement, or lack of improvement, I will adjust my routine accordingly.
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Starly,
    You stated about the necessity of goals:
    "I'm going to have to disagree with this.
    ----
    Sorry, I was being unclear, let me explain. When I say goal or Point of Focus, I'm referring to things like "Do you want to be in a community band, the All-State band, the Symphony," ect..
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Gman,
    You stated:
    "Dr.Mark, dogging a hero is a good start, but after awhile as technique develops and goals are reached and readdressed, find a new hero then another then another until they are all integrated into the unique techniques you achieved with your goals, then you become your own hero."
    ---
    Yes, but one hero at a time!!
    Dr.Mark
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I don't get what you are driving at - NO ONE sounds like Maynard - not even someone who has been dogging him for years. Isn't that what I said in my post?

    Keep in mind, the clinic I was at was a drummer's clinic, and drummers tend to take that to a different place than trumpet players. They'll build a setup that looks just like their hero's and they'll learn those songs stroke for stroke, but no matter what, they are never going to hit the drums the same way because they aren't them. Everyone has a distinct sound - whether or not it's something that works in a real music situation is another matter entirely.

    Dr. Mark, If you really want to know if you have a distinct sound, post a video up that has some of your playing - I'll tell you who I think you sound like.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You sound like Dr.Mark, and that's about the best compliment I could ever give!
     

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