Tighter abs?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Myshilohmy, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    veery715 sez:
    Inhale and then exhale while saying: "ha ha ha" in short explosive syllables. Put your hand on your belly while doing this and you should be able to feel it move. This is where the push comes from when we talk about breath support.
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    listen to veery
     
  2. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    I will agree if lead trumpet playing is meant as playing beyond G above the staff in mezzopiano or louder.

    :lol:
    .
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  3. Sam24

    Sam24 New Friend

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    I am a novice but this seems to me to be the most natural way of playing. If you take a big enough breath you'll have plenty of "pressure" coming out.
     
  4. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    That concept probably works pretty well with recorders and flutes.

    :oops:

    www.recordermaster.com
     
  5. Sam24

    Sam24 New Friend

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    Then again I guess everybody thinks about things differently. No need to insult me.
     
  6. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    Sorry, dear.

    What I was trying to say is:
    Relaxation of the respiratory system (alone) just does not provide a sufficient airstream for playing any note on a trumpet.
    A certain tension in the abs is always involved when buzzing your lips.
    When playing high and/or loud there may be even quite a lot of tension in the abs.

    This is one reason for playing trumpet being a healthy thing to do: it assists digestion.

    But one should not overdo it, of course.

    :stars:
    .
     
  7. The Dutch Guy

    The Dutch Guy Piano User

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    just in case someone want some more of the medical stuff:
    When inhaling you use the diafragm and external intercostal muscles.
    exhaling in resting state doesn't use any muscles. The digfragm and external intercostal muscles relax, and the elasticity of the lungs make them get back into their original shape.
    Forced expiration (which we use when playing the trumpet) uses the internal intercostal muscles and indirectly the abdominal muscles. The abdominal muscles put pressure on your intestines, stomach, liver ect. and those put pressure on the diafragm, which in turn compresses the lungs, making you breath out.
    You don't use your diafragm as a muscle during expiration! Muscle fibers can only do 2 things: contract and relax. During inspiration the diafragm (which is dome-shaped) contracts, making it more dish-shaped. during expiration it does nothing.
     
  8. Bixel

    Bixel Pianissimo User

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    It for sure does do something: it relaxes.

    ROFL
    .
     
  9. The Dutch Guy

    The Dutch Guy Piano User

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    you know what I meant...
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Time to toss the good 'ol Vulgano "RAY OF POWER" into the ring again:

    The finicky thing about air is that, yeah, we must learn the mechanics but then forget about them, because under the stress of performance, as tension sets in, our bodies will lie to us, and it will feel like we're moving huge amounts of air, breathing deeply and supporting when in fact, we are not!

    For this reason, I rely on some Vulgano Voodoo and the RAY OF POWER. It involves the Root Chakra, which is located directly at the base of the spine, also known as the coccyx. The chakras have their own mystic qualities, I guess. I don't know for sure, but they do seem to be located in parts of the body where bunches of nerves meet. (The Vulgano version is situated half way between the places we do our number one and number two in the restroom.)

    In practice and in theory, imagine (and feel) a ray of some sort (red is the most common mystic color associated with the root chakra) shooting down into the ground while playing. For high notes, imagine (and feel) a more intense ray. If we practice this sitting in a chair, we can notice all kinds of muscles come into play, which happen to be the same muscles used to "support" the air stream. By taking attention off of the mechanics and experiencing the mysterious, magical and not yet patented RAY OF POWER we can avoid some of the tension involved in "trying hard."

    Nothing mysterious and magical here really, but the RAY OF POWER does permit me to play with a relaxed but working body.
     

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