Titanium?

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by Heavens2kadonka, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Okay, while surfing around here one day, I found a link on Google for something called "Titanovation." I was wondering if anyones had a chance to play a titanium piece yet?

    Van
     
  2. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

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    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    They are very expensive. Here is the rationale:

    Titanium - a soft and robust material 
    A TITANOVATION mouthpiece is practically indestructible - scratches, dents and deformed shafts are a thing of the past. The TITANOVATION mouthpiece also feels soft and "warm" to the touch. It reaches body temperature immediately after the first blow, harmonizes with the lips and supports the player. 

    The musician has the final say


    They cost about the same as a Monette Prana mouthpiece. I guess you would have to try some to find out.

    Jim
     
  3. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Titanium is normally found as a soft, sponge-like material. When it is concentrated after mining and turned into "metal", it is a grey, lusterous material with only 45% of the weight of steel but the same strength (which is much higher than brass!) Has a very low coefficient of heat transfer (think of "insulator"). It is most often used to alloy with steels to form ultra-hard, ultra-heat and corrosion resistant metals used inside the "hot" areas of things like jet and piston aircraft engines, etc. (We use a titanium-based stainless steel sheet to "protect" cast iron components in some of our machinery at work... where "regular" stainless started to corrode severely after only 4 months in operation, the Ti stuff has lasted over 10 years). Bloody expensive though.

    PS.. I find the comments that it is "soft and robust" and "practically indestructible" to be somewhat contradictory. Is it fish or fowl? Can't be both.
     
  4. Robert Rowe

    Robert Rowe Mezzo Piano User

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    Dec 24, 2004
    "Bloody expensive" is right. Anything made of Titanium is expensive. I have a utensil for eating, called a "spork" (combination fork & spoon), which I use while hiking, climbing, mountaineering, etc... (we're fanatical about reducing weight -- even drilling holes in our toothbrushes) ... anyhow, this "spork" is TEN (10) DOLLARS (US) !

    Never tried a Titanium mouthpiece ... happy with what I use.

    Did try a Titanium-belled Stomvi trumpet -- I think it was a "Mambo".
    It really "sizzled" upstairs -- I liked it. Don't remember the price ....

    Regards,
    Robert Rowe
     
  5. dave_59

    dave_59 New Friend

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    Jan 12, 2005
    the mambos aint cheap, i think the are between 2500 and 2750 dollars but im not sure.
    dave
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Stories of the Titanium-belled Stomvi are greatly exaggerated. The only titanium in that horn is found in the valve caps (or was it the valve rods?) There was quite a go-round on this issue about a year ago and finally answered by a Stomvi dealer as I recall. They do have very light bells (in fact, the whole trumpet is ultra-light) but that's probably more to do with a super-thin gauge bell than the material.

    Edit: I've also heard it widely reported (on trumpet sites only!) that titanium is not used more because it is poisonous. I've checked the MSDS sheets and the only real risks they mention is a slight chance of irritation. Titanium is not absorbed well by the body and by far the vast amount of it "passes" quite nicely. Reports of fibrosis of the lungs from inhaling titanium dust are apparently not supported sufficiently to be statistically significant although the "possibility" is mentioned. Mind you, when titanium is alloyed with other elements you can get completely different compounds with completely different characteristics.
     
  7. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Go to Felix's site, and click on the Stomvi section. There is the Debut, the Forte, the Mambo, the Elite, the Mahler, and the Master.

    And yes, good LORD, these are not cheap horns by any means..

    What also seems to just up the price is mention of "Bellflex" in the materials for creating the bell. The rest of the body is just yellow brass and monel valves, so all the money for a Stomvi is in the bell and caps...

    Van
     
  8. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Well, I will say this for the Stomvi Mambo, that darlin' is LIGHT! I went from a ZKT 1500 to the Mambo and nearly threw the Mambo through the roof. The sound is brilliant and projected. Definitely something for a Mariachi band. It had a lot of nice characteristics, but I'd probably go with the Elite or a more "legit" geared horn.
     
  9. Heavens2kadonka

    Heavens2kadonka Forte User

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    Yes, I would go for the Elite first, as well. The Mahler sounds really cool, though.

    Van
     
  10. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    Yeah, I've only tried the Mambo, but I would bet just off of that horn that the Elite, Mahler, and Master are some really nice horns.
     

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