To clean or not to clean

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nickenator, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    +1 on the.swabbing! You should make it a mandatory part of your pack up routine! !!
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Nothing better than a good chem clean with swabing... Uggg... Very good Chemoswabe.
     
  3. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I steam clean my horns when I can. It's faster than soaking and kills more unfriendly organisms.
    Of course, on vintage horns this isn't always a good thing as steam can take the old fashioned lacquer
    off in a hurry. It doesn't seem to harm new horns' lacquer.

    I did an experiment when I first got my steam cleaner, where I had my brass repair guy chem clean a couple tuning slides off older horns.
    Then I steam cleaned them after I got them back and swabbed the inside. I found that the steam removed
    "stuff" that the chem cleaning left behind.

    So, I'm not a fan of chem cleaning.

    I'll use acid when I have stubborn mineral deposits, but that only takes a few minutes to loosen up.
    I would never let my horn soak in any chemical, just warm dishwater or clean water.

    I also like to pressure dry the inside. Again, for speed. It blows all the water out without leaving
    anything behind.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    What kind of steam cleaner you use? I had one horn chem cleaned once. NEVER AGAIN!!! Screwed up the action of the valves! Manager said that happens sometimes BUT they could lap them into shape for me!
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I have a Shark steam cleaner I bought maybe 5 years ago from Sears.

    You know, I am not sure why that valve stickiness happens after chem cleaning, but I have heard it from a number of people.

    Hopefully Ivan will weigh in, he likely has a theory.

    Some thoughts -
    1) the chemical is not being rinsed away properly
    2) the chem clean loosened "junk" from one place inside and it ended up in the valves
    3) the rinse left water in the valves
    4) the chem clean opened "pores" in the surface of the brass cylinders that cause the piston to no longer glide
    freely up and down

    Wish I had time and tools to do an experiment and figure out why this happens, because it seems to be very common.

    Once I went to steam, followed by brushing, rinsing and pressure drying this problem went away for me.
    It would sometimes happen when I used to do the soapy water soaking thing.
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Another dumb question. How do you hold the pieces while cleaning so you don't burn your hands? First thought was oven mitt but that seems too clumsy. I am highly intrigued!
     
  7. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    Maybe a "helping hands" device? Certainly not a vise, but some kind of clamp thing:roll::oops:
     
  8. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I have those heavy duty chemical proof gloves that go up the forearm.
    They pretty much keep the heat out. Of course, if you point the steam right on the gloves
    for too long even they get too hot.
     
  9. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi nick,
    Here's what I do:
    1.Take trumpet apart
    2. Take parts to the shower or outside to the garden hose.
    3. With high speed water, hose out each part separately (hold the parts firm or they will shoot out of your hand!!)
    4. Once the parts have been pressure hosed, take the parts to the sink and fill sink with hot water
    5. Once the trumpet is covered with hot water, put in some dish detergent.
    6. Let soak for around 10 or so minutes
    7. Snake out the parts including the mouthpiece (especially the mouthpiece!)
    8. Lightly scrub slides of any oxidation (green looking stuff)
    9. Put each snaked part on a towel to dry
    10. Take main trumpet chassis and shake out the water and let dry along side the tubing as described in (9.)
    11.Lube 1 & 3 slides with Lanonsol and the main tuning slide and second valve U pipe with Vasoline.
    11. Put horn back together
    -----
    How often to clean? it depends on level of use. I clean mine about ever two weeks. If I don't, I get gunked up pretty bad and that effects the valves and the sound.
    Hope this helps.
    Dr.Mark
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Just made the one correction to Dr. Mark's advice.
     

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