To refinished or not to refinish

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Adrianbyrne, Oct 6, 2012.

  1. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    Lacquer on brass instruments has always been considered a temporary finish, and when you consider that lacquer wasn't even offered by most companies until the 30s, we don't really have that kind of history, either. Not quite the same as a 200 year old dresser.

    Something else to remember, when you sent your horn back to the factory for an overhaul, they stripped it and relacquered it. What some of you might think of as "original" lacquer may well not be... you just don't know.

    I refuse to play a crappy-looking dented horn. I've had six or seven horns restored, which included a relacquering, and never did I think "oh crap, I ruined it!" Every horn played as well or better.

    The only reason to not restore is that you're not (yet) convinced you're keeping the horn long enough to amortize the restoration. Otherwise, they were intended to be refinished after an overhaul.

    Tom
     
  2. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Tom,
    Has Charlie had any difficulty preserving crispness of engraving on the instruments he has refinished for you? I have seen many of your "after" pictures, but I just do not remember effects on engraving.
    Jim
     
  3. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Charlie himself has said that he hates seeing engraving buffed over and he always takes extra care. Something else to consider... my daily-driver Lightweight 400 was previously refinished and the engraving was buffed over. He sent the bell to Sherry at Artistic Engraving and she recut it so it looked like new. So if your current engraving looks like crap, it can also be restored with the rest of the horn.

    Tom
     
  4. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    + Infinity to the higher power
     
  5. acarcido

    acarcido Forte User

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    I agree for the most part with Tom. When a horn is Reburbished/Reconditioned by a skilled craftsman. The natural qualities of the horn are restored if not improved. By todays standards, compression is much much better than what was required, say back in the 1950's. So if you get a valve job done one an oldie of that time. You will get back a horn with better complression than when it was first made and sold from the factory. The downside to restoration is that when you go for the economy deal with some unknown person who just relaquered an old straight horn and uses that to claim they restored it and did a complete overhaul. You risk a getting a horn that looks good but sounds crappy due to all the minor defects that they did not know to fix. I've heard of some horrible stories in my time, but never from the major names. If anything is wrong in the restoration they usually fix it up right away and most have excellent customer service, mostly. Just don't ask Mendez about his two horns at an un-named restoration craftman of high regards.
     
  6. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Thank you, Tom.
    Jim
     

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