Tone Quality

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jazztrpt006, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. jazztrpt006

    jazztrpt006 New Friend

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    Jul 16, 2008
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    Hey guys i have a quick question concerning my tone quality. I am in the means of wanting to fix/improve my tone so that it sounds less forced/pinchy if you will and more free blowing (ex. roy hargrove, freddie hubbard, etc..) I've been playing the trumpet for just over 6 years so I'm no beginner. I play on a Bach 37G with a kanstul B6 (monette like copy) mouthpiece. Many people say to practice long tones, lip slurs, ect... But does anyone have any comments on that or anything new that you would like to share?
    I'm getting ready for University in the fall so any advice would be appreciated!

    jazztrpt006
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to TM, jazztrpt006!

    Long tones can be very good if we concentrate on getting the room to vibrate. It is not just a case of holding a note a long time, but building resonance in space--kinda weird, but fun at the same time!

    In talking about tone quality, there is not just the overtone structure to consider--the attack and release are important as well. Being able to record ourselves and play it back is a great tool, and if we can play it back at half-speed it can show many a defect.

    Important too is letting our trumpet find its own voice, uhh, also hard to explain, but it is another resonance issue, letting our mouthpiece and trumpet do what they were meant to.

    In the end, the people with the "most beautiful" sounds also tend to be the most musical.

    Funny how that works!

    Have fun!
     
  3. jazztrpt006

    jazztrpt006 New Friend

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    Jul 16, 2008
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    I do listen to alot of trumpet players that i find have the ideal tone that i look for. Such as clifford brown, roy hargrove, freddie hubbard, lee morgan ect...I do find though that i guess wheni was in middle school i think i developed a habit of toughing using the sylable "ta" now i know theres nothing essentually wrong with that but when saying a sylable like "ta" you can hear the defined attack then pitch/ air folllowed after.... giveing a very harsh/broken sound. I've been trying to use the sylable "da" as it allows for the air to continuing moving, more "flowly tounging" if you get wat i mean. The issue is i cant seem to grasp the "da" concept.

    The only things i hve issue with is using "da" instead of "ta" and making my tone that much wamer. As I've said before i listen to tons of the artists listen above and yet my playing is still the same....paitence is a virtue ....i know but i need another way on approaching these "tasks"....

    It's hard to explain on here when you can't get an idea of what i sound like.... but ahh lol any other tips?
     
  4. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    Is what you sound like necessarily bad? or do you not just like it. I never like Miles Davis's tone, but it was unique. Maynard had... unique tone as well, but it was his own, and no one can reproduce either of the two. Listen to what you want, and play with what your listening too, it will come
     
  5. bagmangood

    bagmangood Forte User

    consistency is the answer for better tone,
    If you can get it so your airflow is constant, your tone will open up and broaden. "ta" vs. "da" doesn't really matter necessarily,
    its the vowel of the note that does. Its all air, search for Rowuk's circle of breathing posts on this site and the monette.net stuff on posture and breathing. It'll probably help
     
  6. jazztrpt006

    jazztrpt006 New Friend

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    Jul 16, 2008
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    It probably has to do with the fact the i'm not happy with my tone....I mean in general it's not horrible but its nothing special/great, you know what i mean? It definatley needs improvement, in my opinion .. I've been told many times that airflow is the key thing but with my habbit of tounging (da/ta where just a few examples to show the difference between the two) it does not allow that to happen. And that's where i stand as of now.
     
  7. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    If your just having really "Fluffy" attacks, just start out slow, with Da, Da, Da, Da, Daaaa. Just like beggingers. Since you've been playing awhile, you'll get it down quicker, but just work on that really slowly. Sometimes working on things slowly seems idiotic and just a waste of time, but it really really does help.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    JazzTrumpet006,

    I would start with an attitude check. Our sound very often is a reflection of our soul, and if you are a bit aggressive or wimpy, that could thin out or brighten up your sound. Playing warm is sexy, and I don't mean the california blonde with gold chain type.

    Practice extremely softly, scales, slurs EVERYTHING. Get into that understatement mood. Close your eyes when practicing modal scales. Get into your own head when playing the trumpet. Introspective is the word. Turn the lights down, light a candle, make sure you aren't rushed before a practice session. Body and Soul not Testosterone and Show-Off.

    I have never been successful in changing someones tone by giving them other things to practice, rather by giving them a new way of life. You can do it - if you are willing to let go!

    Get "in the mood"!
     
  9. jazztrpt006

    jazztrpt006 New Friend

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    Jul 16, 2008
    Wpg, Mb
    Everyone on here has given some great adive, thanks! I'm actually needing to reposition my mouthpiece; as of now it's more 25/75(in ratio to the upper-lower lips) I'm needing to make it more 50/50 and have tried it already and it feels extremly "out of place" cause the 25/75 feel has been the norm for sometime now. ...has anyone had to do a transition like this and how long did it take to get it to feel like the norm...and advice....everyone is different i know but the info would be greatly appreciated
     
  10. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2007
    California
    actually you have it in about the opposite position haha. Most players have it 2/3 upper lip and 1/3 lower lip, and alot of people do it 50/50 tool Just work with whatever feels comfterable to you. You might even want to try an assymetric mouthpiece, I think that would work well for your current chop setup.
     

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