Tongue position

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JHSTrumpet, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    This thread reminds of something I heard in a master class. There no big problems in trumpet play. All problems can be traced to something wrong with the fundementals. Other then breathing, it probably does not get more fundemental than tonguing.

    BrotherBACH
     
  2. study888

    study888 Mezzo Forte User

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    Lynn K. Asper, who wrote a method book titiled; a Physical Approach to Playing the Trumpet. For the low register low F# to D just below the treble clef staff. He recommended the tongue strike vowel "thow".

    For middle register,the tongue strike vowel "thah". For the Upper register,the tongue strike vowel "thih". For the Extreme Upper Register the tongue strike vowel 'Thee".

    So many teachers and so many methods. One can only hope he/she gets the right teacher, that uses a method that best suits his or her type embouchure set up

    Not so sure all Pro trumpet teachers know or condone all these methods we read about. When I first started back and was just practicing for a good tone and improving my air. I was doing it seemed O.K.

    Then I started trying all these embouchure methods and buying differant mouthpieces etc..things started getting worse and much of the fun was gone. Went back to the basics I knew. Everything got better. If I run into a future problem,will seek a local Pro player. Best fix one problem at a time.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I teach proper tonguing to all my students. I have to disagree with Rowuk here as I've been very successful teaching tonguing over Skype. But you do need a good mic. I found a good cheap one from Logitech. As for the syllables, if you are using the tip of the tongue method, say TAA. don't use any other syllable. esp. the ones I've seen listed here. Esp the ones with TH in them and not DIT either. The TAA syllable is the motion the tongue makes when we single tongue. Keep the tongue relaxed, not limp, just relaxed. IMPORTANT< support with the air. Visulize blowing through the tongue with the air. beyond this I would have to see and hear you. But everybody who comes to me I've been able to help. It's usually a simple fix because you are doing something basic wrong.
     
  4. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I guess that's the problem. When I take the trumpet away everything's fine. When I add it it's not. And that kinda makes sense to me since just saying syllables is very different from saying them with an embouchure in place (unless you talk with the exact same "embouchure" as you play). The post earlier about presumably a professional teacher saying THEE, etc. seems closest to the anchor technique so I'm gonna stick with that and adjust to make it cleaner.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The THEE will get the teeth in the way of the airflow. Start with the simple taa, as Bob Grier recommends. If, as you say, you are able to do this with the mouthpiece removed but not when in place, then I would think you a putting way too much pressure on you lips with the mouthpiece. Can you Taa with just a light placement? Give that a try... but really... this does need to be in the presence of a teacher (or on skype with Bob) to really assess the dynamics of the process.

    I will disagree with Bob on one thing only... Once the taa is sounded, do try to expiement with daa, and dit, duu and deh as this is how we change the phrasing of a note. Softening the tongue with a duu over taa will provide a lighter attach that works well for legato phrasing. Dit is how we get a hard staccato sounding
    .
     
  6. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Arban's says TU......for what it's worth.
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    The other syllables are used, but I have my students stay with the Taa at first until they have it. Then I will Introduce Daa, Dat, etc. when we work on a softer attack or jazz tonguing.
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    And it's a French Tu, not our english Too. But I find that Taa put the tongue in the most relaxed position.

    To the OP, when you play and tongue you think Taa and let your tongue make the movement it makes when you say Taa. If you just try and blow air and tongue with out the horn, thinking Taa, you will get a sound that sounds a little like a Too.
     
  9. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Ohhhhh......a French Tu.........Dangit!! I've been doing it wrong for over 25 years!! **tongue in chic** HAHA PUN INTENDED!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Bob, that does make great sense. Thanks for clarifying.
     

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