Tonguing with "duh" versus "tuh"

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Creaphis, Jan 27, 2010.

  1. Creaphis

    Creaphis New Friend

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    Dec 21, 2009
    As the two sounds are produced in more-or-less the exact same way, except that "Ts" are voiced while "Ds" are not, it seems that it should be sensible to tongue mainly with a "duh" sound instead of a "tuh" sound, especially in legato-tongued phrases where even the very brief interruption in airflow caused by producing a "tuh" sound is unwanted. Is tonguing with a "duh" considered as acceptable technique, or is it always better to tongue with a "tuh," even if you have to do so extremely delicately?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Using D for T is a common thing. The consummate trumpet player wants it all!

    I will disagree about legato though. I have found that a quick, sharp articulation makes the phrase sound more "connected" to the audience and still retains the individual notes. The D-sound is softer and less articulate and useful when one wants that effect.

    The problem for many players with a T is that the breath support is not good enough to support the sound. The compensation is to more brutally tongue as that hammering gets the sound started more easily. Once the player has their breathing down, a whole new world of articulation opens up.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Yours is a question that I've often pondered and asked about; the best answer I ever got came from Larry Jess, Principal trumpet in the Spokane Symphony.

    His answer? "Whatever."

    On first hearing, a kind of hippy-dippy Grateful Dead answer designed to frustrate young section players with first tenure in a regional orchestra. On the surface, a flip answer, but in Zen terms, as good if not better than Nike's Just Do It.

    "Whatever" is a short form of "whatever works." Frustrating as that was, it forced us as section players to mind-meld to our principal (who mind-melded to the other principals and most of the time the conductor).

    Truth is, a hard "Duh" can be harder than a soft "Tuh."

    Truth is, it doesn't really matter which articulation one uses, as long as it serves Music.

    Whatever.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2010
  4. RichJ

    RichJ Piano User

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    You might want to watch Joey Pero's video blog on YouTube regarding the syllable DUHT for articulation, which focuses on the end of the note (i.e., its overall shape rather than just the "attack").
     
  5. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Rowuk sez:
    "The problem for many players with a T is that the breath support is not good enough to support the sound. The compensation is to more brutally tongue as that hammering gets the sound started more easily. Once the player has their breathing down, a whole new world of articulation opens up".
    -------------
    Boy is that true about "T"!! I remember taking a lesson from a college professor who taught trumpet who is also a symphony player. Once I got warmed up, I played a couple of things for him and once I got through playing he leaned over and said "QUIT YELLING AT ME!! He was referring to my jackhammer tonguing and my poor use of air.
    I've since worked on that and its true that getting control of the air and coordinating it withthe tongue isn't easy but wow, once you get it. things really get fun.
     
  6. Creaphis

    Creaphis New Friend

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    Thank you all for the input.
     

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