Too Much Pressure!?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by LSN1052, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

    29
    0
    Sep 5, 2009
    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    I am a junior in high school.

    1st chair Symphonic Band

    Play 1st part in Symphony Orchestra

    Lead Trumpet in Jazz Band.

    (Not to toot my own horn [ironic] just details for your analysis)

    I have struggled with my range forever, but if been slowly getting it up there with my teacher.

    However recently towards the end of Jazz practice i notice a 'indentation' on the right side of my lips. Its not exactly swelling, but its kinda bruised on the inside ish. Obviously that is caused by using too much pressure. I normally put my pinky in the ring and play just fine, but i guess just having all these ledger lines thrown in my face in jazz subconciously makes me use way more pressure and i cram the horn down my throat. But i dont have the sensation in my teeth that your teeth are being pushed back?

    I warm down extremely good everday and every seperate rehersal. i buzz my lips constently on the drive home, get home and ice them for 10 ish minutes.

    I will talk with my teacher tomorrow because she can actually look at it. Although i havent played all weekend to rest.

    Is this just my embouchure adjusting to the workload? (that happend sophmore year during marching season, my top lip basiclly morphed into the mouthpiece shape) Is icing the right thing to do? Are there better treatments for this like heat? Should I just simply not play with my pinky in the ring? :dontknow:
     
  2. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008
    In my opinion if a junior in high school has to ice his chops after a rehearsal then he's doing something wrong. The pinky in the ring isn't the problem, using too much pressure is.

    You're young, so you'll probably be able to recover quickly, but unless you change something I'd say you're on your way to hurting yourself.

    Work with your teacher and discuss this.
     
  3. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

    29
    0
    Sep 5, 2009
    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    Well if theres a dent in my pinky finger too from the ring the im subconciously using pressure. Im saying what if i just but my pinky on top of the little ring like your supposed to then i wouldnt use pressure. Pinky = Pressure. I will talk with my teacher, thank you for giving another opinion.
     
  4. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi LSN,
    Here's something you may want to look in to. Mouthpiece pressure device that teaches you how to use less pressure. Also, look at your your forearm. Is it pointed back toward your body or is it straight out from the trumpet valves?
    Some mouthpiece pressure can be significantly reduced by moving out the forearm so its straight out from the trumpet valves. If your forearm is leaning back towards the body, there seems to be a natural tendency to "pull" or clench the horn towards the face, especially when fatigue, tension or stress is put in the mix.
    Hope this helps
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
  5. a marching trumpet

    a marching trumpet Mezzo Piano User

    529
    1
    Feb 11, 2009
    Murfreesboro, TN
    Id say work on less pressure relax more, Just in your practices at home kinda play like your all loose, if you can hit it while your loose then your good for playing. Thats what I had to do and it helped out alot, so now any high note I can get I can hit it relaxed and it really helps when you are told to "give it hell"
     
  6. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

    1,869
    210
    Oct 16, 2008

    The pinky indentation is a symptom that tells us you're playing with too much pressure. You need to do more than put your pinky on top or the hook to change what you're doing. Play lots of ppp scales, songs, arpeggios, slurs, etc. as softly and as in control as you can.

    If changing the position of your pinky is the only thing you'll do, your body will just compensate with more pressure from your left arm. Right now it sounds like the only way you know how to play is with pressure...
     
  7. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

    29
    0
    Sep 5, 2009
    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    That, is exactly what i needed to know. :thumbsup:

    A solution too :play:.

    Now is ice okay after rehearsals?
     
  8. ltg_trumpet

    ltg_trumpet Mezzo Piano User

    669
    3
    Jan 21, 2009
    ive never iced my lips until a couple of days ago at all state jazz, after like 10 hours of practice and what not. and? it turned out not to help at all, i woke up the day of the performance with a massive swollen lip. i honestly dont think icing helps. but thats just me.
     
  9. LSN1052

    LSN1052 New Friend

    29
    0
    Sep 5, 2009
    Lee's Summit, Missouri
    Well I guess theres really three options:

    1. Do nothing

    2. Ice it like any other bruise, to stop the blood from swelling

    3. Heat/vibration? to circulate the blood? I dont know how that would help but i heard it.
     
  10. reedy

    reedy Piano User

    450
    17
    Jul 31, 2009
    Wiltshire, UK
    there are a few other excersizes you can do to help reduce the pressure: hold your trumpet with your thums one at the tuning slide and the other on the bessl pipe but neer your mouth then try and play, i heard about a guy who used string to hang his trumpet from the cealing try that if you get desperate....

    with the ice thing ive never done it personaly but i have used armica cream, its a natural hearb remady cream that reduces bruses and swelling its fantastic stuff! try it, it really is good stuff!
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2010

Share This Page