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Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by AndrewWK, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    The reason i ask is because before the summer started i had a very weak high c that could not be held out to save my life during jazz. I worked very hard during the summer to help my range.(slurings, scales, and arpeggios). 4 months later i have a blistering e-flat, very good e, and then it dies into a very shacky f. I have above average skills all around but my range has not been anything to brag about. I want to improve apon my ok range so that i have the ability to scream in the stands and not only play stuff up an octave but sound good.doing so. Right now i can not. What could possibly get me there?

    Thanks for all your support,
    AndrewWK
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Forte User

    1,255
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    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    Hard work and patience. Like someone said before, there are millions of methods and ways of getting there. You must find a way to help yourself. Just don't think too hard about it all, music should be fun/inspirational to yourself and your audience... it shouldn't be a thorn in your side. Taking simple melodies up always works well in gettin' the ear to hear the notes up there since the partials are closer together. In some cases, people have to switch mpcs... and yes, a chops doctor is just saying to find a good teacher who knows what they are doing and can do what you wish to do. One last thing, FUNDAMENTALS!!! PLEASE, PLEASE don't become one of these so-called "screamers" who can only play high with a small, out of tune sound. There are way too many of 'em, especially at my school, geesh. But that's a different story for a different forum.

    TRICKG: I also have problems with findin times to sit down and have a good practice to keep up my chops. something I've found that works for me is to buzz a lot when I'm off the horn... just thought I'd throw that out to you. Take care.


    Bear

    YOU are the sound... the trumpet is just the median that expresses it. Think about it.
     
  3. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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  4. fatcat

    fatcat New Friend

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    Jun 28, 2004
    Portland, Oregon
    Cat Anderson

    Long tones at different dynamics in the upper register

    Playing things you know well and can hear all the pitches very well to up an octave

    Working on general flexibility

    Just play a lot in the upper register

    I have plenty of problems for range myself, but personally, I've seen the biggest improvement when focusing on these (many of which were mentioned before). The mentality I have going into the notes seems to affect how well the came out too. For example, if I go into a note thinking.. wow.. that's really high, I'm going to tighten up and squeak the note out at best. I have to relax myself, hear the note in my head, and just open everything up.
     
  5. talcito

    talcito Piano User

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    Feb 18, 2004
    Instead of taking songs up one octave I would reccomend you take simple melodies and take it up chromatically in half steps.

    This approach is more gradual and is great for ear training.

    Bill Knevitt has a book "You Can Scream with Endurance to Spare" which uses this excellent approach over many types of melodies. Check out his website. The book is quite inexpensive. I have used it for years.
     
  6. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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  7. tclement

    tclement New Friend

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    Jan 4, 2004
    Here are tools/methods that I am using to work on my range :

    1. Lessons with a good nearby teacher. Well rounded - Arban, Etudes, Transposition, Lip Slurs, Tonguing.

    2. Reading Pops books and website articles (many times) and doing the exercises and tips - http://www.bbtrumpet.com

    3. Reading the Balanced Embouchure book (by Jeff Smiley) and working on the exercises - http://www.trumpetteacher.net

    4. Daily practice - 1 - 2hrs

    5. Practicing for a 15-20 minute durations

    6. Reading posts and asking questions on TPIN and the TrumpetHerald

    7. Periodic lessons with Pops - he knows how to play high. My local teachers don't specialize in playing high.

    8. Daily use of Jeanne Pocious' exercises - http://abel.hive.no/oj/musikk/trompet/jeanne/

    9. Listening to trumpet music daily - as many different artists and styles that I can get my hands on. Sometimes I'll listen to the same cd for weeks before it gets old

    10. Reading others ideas - Bob Findley, Jerome Callet, Claude Gordon, Mark Van Cleeve....etc. OJ's website has a wealth of information and links - http://abel.hive.no/trumpet/

    I hope this helps in some way. My thinking is to become an "expert" by studying, learning and experimenting as much as possible until I find what works for me.

    Tim
     
  8. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    Right now i found a Cat Anderson book on roddytrumpet.com and that has helped some but because of marching band and region my time is very scarce. Not to mention all the homework each day.

    ANywho,
    tcleman, thanks for all that info. Currently i am taking lessons with a trumpeter at the Dallas Symphony. But due to freelancing oppertunities i have been unable to take from him in about three weeks.

    Right now i would say my range is my weakest point of my playing. It holds me back from playing songs that i would ormally be able to play if i had the range. Thank you for not being nieve.
     
  9. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Nov 2, 2003
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  10. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    I have just started and have 4 lssons under my belt.

    We work on....
    Stamp for mp buzzing(it has improved my sound greatly)
    Shlosburg(slurs mainly)


    We have yet to work on the range and chop stuff yet.

    Thanks,
    AndrewWK
     

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