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Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by AndrewWK, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    I'm pretty sure he has his reasons for not doing that yet.
     
  2. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    What makes you say that? I'm in 11th grade and in region band. It is not like i suck the big one and just want to be like maynerd.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Andrew, you asked what a chop doc is. Here is a short list:
    Donald S. Reinhardt
    Scotty Holbert. (I believe that there is a quote somewhere about the fact that Scotty Holbert helped Carl Fisher, of Maynard Ferguson band fame, get through a sticking point with his chops.)
    Doug Elliot
    Jerome Callet
    Pops McLaughlin
    Jeff Smiley
    Bill Carmichael

    I'm sure there are many more, but these are/were some of the guys that really delved into the mechanics of just what in the heck makes the chops go, and offer methods to get past some bad habits such as spreading the chops and using mouthpiece pressure as you ascend. Believe me and don't let ANYONE kid you; if you spread your chops and use mouthpiece pressure as you ascend, more than likely, you are going to have range and endurance limitations and more practice can actually reinforce the bad habits that are limiting you.
    That's all fine and dandy for you to say it, but geeze, in this day and age of readily available and free information online, why not use it as a resource to try to learn more? I guarantee, he's going to learn more here online that sitting at home trying to make heads or tails of it on his own. Besides, even the basics need to be approached a certain way.

    Diz, your attitude on this perplexes and dismays me. I never had an instructor, nor did I have a resource like the internet that I could have utilized back in the 80s in my southwest Nebraska hometown. I spent a lot (and I mean A LOT!) of time fumbling around, figuring stuff out on my own as I went along because I had a band director who was incompetent, and no one else available to go to. Consequently, I developed a lot of bad habits in those formative years of playing that I have spent over a decade slowly trying to overcome. Believe what you believe, but I give the guy a lot of credit for humbling himself before us to ask and I hope I can help even one person to avoid some of the mistakes that I have made in my playing.
     
  4. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    No, the reason is not so much that you 'suck', but that the exercises that your teacher has you doing are essential to improving your range. Also, who cares if you can squeak out an 'a', 'b' or 'c' above the staff? You need to really own those notes and sound good. The fact that your sound is improving indicates that you need to learn better control of your air--which is crucial for the higher range.

    Don't get testy, youngster---be patient and keep working hard. The results WILL come................
     
  5. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    Thanks trickg, all that stuff makes sense. I will probably look into the players as well as their books. I guess the range thing is just frustrating because there is a whole ocean full of trumpet playing and i find myself just dilly-dalling in the sand and mud. The range thing has just hindered my progressing into deeper waters so to speek.


    Sorry to sound like an @$$. I didn't mean too. Dizprez and Aggieboy were alittle abrassive when questioning my playing abilities. I guess they think everyone how wants to improve their range wants to sound like Maynerd or Aurtoro at what ever the price, wither it is a "special" mp or tone or even tuning. That is simply not the case for me. I wat to improve the aspect that keeps turning its ugly head at me and hindering my progression into the vast world that is music.
     
  6. W Scott

    W Scott Piano User

    488
    4
    Dec 8, 2003
    Carson City, NV.
    Well, the exercises that you are working on are the essentials to going up above the staff. I've found that being able to play low (below the staff) is really helpful.

    I just saw the web site for 'The Balanced Embochure'....looks like there is some intriguing information there that might help!
     
  7. bigaggietrumpet

    bigaggietrumpet Mezzo Forte User

    801
    1
    Jan 23, 2004
    Nazareth, PA
    :lol: Dude, you're getting kinda touchy. Allow me to appologize, I meant no offense to you whatsoever. I know where you're at.

    As to my remark, lemme explain. When you picked up your horn for the first time, did you go straight to a double G? Of course not. You learned the basics and worked your way up. What I was trying to imply (and I didn't mean to be a smartass) was that what your instructor is trying to do is get the mental and fundamentals perfect. You can't really advance as a trumpet player and a musician until you do. So, in my humble opinion (because it really doesn't count for much), I really wouldn't worry about it right now. Relax. Enjoy the fact that you are studying with an amazing musician who can teach you volumes. Don't sweat the high range, it'll come, but with time.

    P.S.- it's Maynard
     
  8. ScreaminRaider

    ScreaminRaider Piano User

    390
    2
    Apr 22, 2004
    San Antonio, Tx
    Wow, who brought the boxing gloves?

    Oh yeah, and it's Arturo, not Aurtoro :lol:
     
  9. AndrewWK

    AndrewWK Pianissimo User

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    Sep 9, 2004
    Whatever!

    Thanks,
    AndrewWK
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    I can see your point, but keep in mind that it would be foolhardy to believe that range is going to come as a natural progression of working on the basics. I used to think that at one time...until I topped out around High C. For years, nothing I did would help me attain anything past a C or D, and I played every day for my job! While a certain amount of range may in fact come that way, if there are other chops problems or he is battling with an inefficient embouchure, he will top out wherever that inefficient setup allows him to top out. That might be a G on the staff. I can totally understand why he might be frustrated with his range if that's the case. If he's thinning out starting at G on the staff, he's going to be topping his range out on a regular basis, and that would frustrate me too.

    It wasn't until I was about 26 or 27 years old that I had been playing long enough for certain things to start clicking somewhat, (and don't think that I didn't practice the fundamentals, because I did) but I still struggle with upper register and endurance, although at this point I have pretty much figured out why I have those problems. The trick for me is to get past years of ingrained bad habits and make a change, but that takes time and dedicated effort, and these days I don't really the time to put toward the dedicated effort. At this point, I'm 34 years old and have the same range that I had when I was 27, although it has gotten a bit more consistent over time.

    Again, I hope that young and enthusiastic trumpet players out there today don't have to fumble around making all the mistakes that I made learning on my own. Andrew, I'm glad that you came here and I'm glad that you asked. If you want, PM me and I can put you in touch with Scotty Holbert, who is a personal friend of mine, and he might know somone in your area that you could see to get your chops straightened out if in fact they need to be straightened out.
     

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