Tounging Speed/Consistency and Articulation

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bear, Jul 21, 2005.

  1. Bear

    Bear Forte User

    1,255
    4
    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    Dear Manny,
    Could you talk a little about tounging speed, consistency and articulation? Recently after pullin' out a metronome and doin' some work, I've noticed that my single tounge speed has diminished. What are some excercises to work on speed/fluidity? Also, could you talk a lil about articulation. Insofar as to mention maybe specific syllabes you like to use for certain passages, etc. Or maybe talk a little about your adjectives of clearness, attack, "bell tone", etc. Thank for your time.

    Tim, The Bear

    BTW - 2 months until Brad Leali becomes our Jazz Studies Director!!! YEE-HAWW!! On a sidenote, did you know that Harry Connick Jr.'s wife is from Lubbock? Kewl huh? Maybe we can get Roger Ingram to pay us a visit...
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Dear Tim,

    Certain people are better at tonguing than others, that's a fact of life. Many have to work at it while others seem to never have to work very hard at it. Maurice Andre used to say that it was something that required his constant attention. I work on it every day and don't feel really ready until I've had some time to articulate clearly and with some speed.

    The key is consistency. That consistency and the willingness to work at that is what makes the difference between a successful player and an unsuccessful one. Consistency of approach is the first due to be paid. I'm a tOOH-tOOH guy, myself, and try to artculate each note, no matter the register, with an emphatic tOOH. The other important consistency is the amount of time put in on articulation. You have to hear very clearly what you want your tonguing to sound like and then work daily towards getting it to sound that way. If you go at it by examining placement at the expense of sound, you are lost. Physiology without the study of sound is useless except in very limited cases where you have an experienced ear that will ultimtely guide the player.

    Working with a metronome is great if you approach it with an endgame in mind. I like to go gradually and build it up to a fast clip. But I start very slowly because the sound is ultimately the most important thing. Avoid tightness at all costs. Stay free and go for a fat sound when tonguing.

    ML
     
  3. Bear

    Bear Forte User

    1,255
    4
    Apr 30, 2004
    USA
    awesome. gracias.

    TB

    Now for a opinion question... slurring, legato, lyrical passages... and discuss!!
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Well, I'm in favor of all of those.

    ML
     
  5. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
    11
    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    Bear- Articulation has always been a problem for me, too. I had a teacher once tell me (building on Manny's consistency approach here) that the key to articulation is endurance of the tongue muscle. Something I heard James Thompson do in a masterclass was this: if you have Herbert Clarke's Characteristic Studies, there are some fine excercises in there(right in the beginning before the etudes) to help build that endurance and consistency. Also, Sigmund Hering's Etudes in All Keys has some great studies to build articulation. Play them slowly so you can listen to yourself carefully and achieve a consistent attack. Another approach I was offered by one of Hickman's students (my college professor) was to go into Arban's to the syncopation studies, play them at very slow tempos, and flutter-tongue the long notes. According to him, Hickman's opinion is that flutter and a clear T sound are produced in the same place. Again, listen carefully to yourself for the character of your attack.

    Hope that helps; it works for me.
     

Share This Page