Tour Stop # 7 NY 1

Discussion in 'Horns' started by dHoff, Apr 8, 2004.

  1. dHoff

    dHoff Pianissimo User

    72
    6
    Feb 13, 2004
    Woodstock, NY
    Grateful though I am to have been included in the tour, the timeing was rather poor. I am working on an embrechure change and can hardly play at all. So my opinion on this horn has less value than usual. I will say that Right out of the case, I was impressed by the Wild Thing.

    It is a beautiful instrument. Heavier than my other horns but felt comfortable in my hands. Playing I found that it slotted effortlessly. It seems a little bright sounding for my taste. When it's time for me to order mine, I'll get brass, not silver plate. I played with the smaller slide as the other was just to open for my taste. I have been told that a different mouthpiece would make a difference but I don't want to make any more changes at this moment.

    The first other player I introduced to the Thing is a local guy who, though he does still have his day job, plays about 70-100 professional gigs a year. Most of these are loud dance band gigs playing over an electric band. He is a very hard blower "a blaster" in his own words. His comments"...it can take all the air I can give...", "...slots double C easily...", "...this is a world class professional horn...", and so on. No doubt he loved the horn.

    I will have more to report tomorrow when a true Legit guy spends some time with the Wild Thing.
     
  2. dHoff

    dHoff Pianissimo User

    72
    6
    Feb 13, 2004
    Woodstock, NY
    OK, I'm back. This morning I turned the Wild Ting over to a true legit pro. He makes his living exclusively playing the trumpet and plays currently as a member of one of the two or three most recognized orchestras in NY. His first notes were a little tentative, less clear than what I am accustomed to hearing from him on his Bach 37. Then it was as if he suddenly understood the instrument and it rang out. The notes were clear and true, a little brighter than his brass strad but absolutely georgeous in tone.

    He then went back to the Bach and then the Wild Thing. His tone is always great but I like the little edge to the tone theat he produced with the Thing. He handed the Wild thing back with approximately the following comments. I have to play this differently, it takes more air. I don't want to change how I play. It is a really nice horn and Flip seems like a great guy. It's just not for me.

    I loved listening to the "road test".

    In the mean time, I am going to play it a bit more before my face to face hand off on Monday. I like this instrument and the face to face is a great way to get to know some new players.


    -dH
     
  3. tom turner

    tom turner Mezzo Forte User

    779
    11
    Oct 25, 2003
    Georgia, USA
    Thanks Doug!

    I too agree that the Wild Thing has the most awesome tone! I've truly found none other I like for myself personally!

    Thanks for having others play it too! No two players will ever like the same things in horns and soooo many people have been playing ML horns for decades, starting in middle school.

    It can be a little bit of a shock at first to play a freer blowing horn when one is a very serious player and has played the ML horn/mouthpiece set up that he's used for decades!

    Thanks for exposing the guy to the WT though! AS you noted, you liked his tone better on the WT. He may have heard this too, ya never know!

    It's easy to "dial in" the trumpet/mouthpiece resistance combination that's correct for a particular player, especially with the new Kanstul Bach-clone tops on Warburton backbores.

    When I got my WT, I'd been playing the finest 37 I'd ever encountered. Figuring it would never be bested, I made it better with a personally selected Pilczuk leadpipe. Awesome, awesome combination . . . until the WT made me change.

    On my Bach, I used a larger numbered, freer blowing backbore on my Warburton tops vs. what I use on the WT. I'm picky as heck about how my horn/mouthpiece combo plays for my taste. Finding the right blow resistance is very important.

    I prefer the benefits of having the resistance in the backbore of the mouthpiece mated to a freer blowing trumpet further down the sound-producing line. ML trumpets, which are stuffier, require a freer blowing mouthpiece.

    I appreciate ALL the reviews being made by the testers on tour! Thanks again for your efforts to get the horn tested by several folks. You are a great guy!

    Sincerely,

    Tom Turner

    PS: Please feel free to post any final comments too!
     
  4. dHoff

    dHoff Pianissimo User

    72
    6
    Feb 13, 2004
    Woodstock, NY
    The whole Mouthpiece resistance issue is something I have yet to tackle but I certainly will when the time comes. I am trully impressed by the Wild Thing. I have read enough to know that it takes some work for a player to shift from one style of instrument to another. I would have loved to see the last mentioned player take the time to make that shift. From what he said, I think the problem was, he was afraid he would never go back. Today I hand it off to the next player. I have enjoyed the ride, though as I said in my first post, the timing was poor for me personally. Clearly, when the time to buy comes around again, The Wild Thing will be the top of my list.

    Thank you Tom and of course Flip, for making this happen.

    -dH
     

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