Transitioning From A beginners trumpet to a Professional One

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RicardoStalwart, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That's is why I suggested above to spend all your present time on the new horn. Learn to relax your approach as it sounds it is an easier blow for you on this new horn. It's about control. When you take the BMW out during rush hour, you ease more on the peddle, don't over steer with the wheel. But when no one is looking and you have an open road, hit the BMW peddle with a Camry attack and watch it shine... as long as you know how to keep the power from skidding off the road, by compensating with control of the wheel.

    Over the years, I have transitioned from an Olds Ambassador to an Olds Recording, to an Olds Super Recording. So I know how the slotting becomes keen and the blow more open as you progress. But you will one day learn that when your technique is solid, your control is spot on, and you have proper use of breathing dynamics, it really doesn't matter which horn, starter or pro, you have in your hand. You will get an excellent response whenever you play, because when it comes right down to it... it is your physiology that rules and controls the horn. AND you will sound the horn like you want it to sound, again by biofeedback of the horn on your lips, and you instantaneously adjusting to compensate.

    There are skilled drivers that can make a Toyota Camry out perform any novice BMW driver. Same is true of the beginner versus pro trumpet... what ever that is.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    For lack of better words, I'd say that each instrument has its own personality, its own voice. Part of our practice is spent forcing the instrument to do our will, but the best results come when we let the instrument sing. Note the differences between instruments to be sure, but it isn't necessarily good to try to get a professional instrument to emulate a beginner's horn.
     
  3. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    Thanks Mike Ill see if that helps ; I See your from MD; What part do you reside from? Im In the College PArk-Silver Spring -DC area
     
  4. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    Thanks, Ill take all those things into consideration; Time will tell I also forgot to consider that my mouthpiece got jammed into my old horn and I have been using one of those bach megatone 3c type mouthpieces which came with my horn which was ok but ; I like the heavier one I have now the tone is so beautiful. So essentially i HAD TO readjust back to my mouthpiece. The jazz band I play in at school starts back in 2 weeks hopefully I get it together by then wish me luck!
     
  5. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    Interesting, perhaps I do need to use more; I was applying about the same I did with my older horn.

    I'm very selective about instruments I buy; for my first horn I wanted something that wouldnt cost alot as I didnt plan to use a beginners horn that long; and boy Im quite satisfied with that horn, its so bright, very light, and easy to maintain. After I upgraded then, I started to notice differences . I dont know too many people dissatisfied with there Roy Benson Horns, there just unpopular in U.S, I know schools in Europe that use them. New American Horns are so overpriced and I just happen to like new horns.

    The overall quality of this horn is excellent, I took it to my music store and they were amazed at the quality of the horn. Time will tell if its durable or not. The next horn I buy maybe 5 years from now will probably be one of those cool Adams trumpets(sure) That Christian Scott Plays (dnt know if u know him) . I got a thing for weird/cool looking instruments.
     
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Please don't worry about the higher end chinese horn now. I have had a number through my hands and never had a problem with quality or valves. My Packer cornet was sold because despite it being a fab instrument in many ways the sound lacked (for me) a little character and as I have said many times I find some Xenos have the same issue (Perhaps I should explain I find them too clean and clinical with a lack of real guts, perhaps a little too light weight for their own good). The Pakcer trumpet I had to sell because I needed to make a bill and it was a very hard decision to sell it, actually I still miss it. My Mayflower D/Eb has a very nice tone and few intonation problems for a cheap horn and the valves have been perfect since day 1, I had an Aqua Sullis Picc which never let me down, I traded it in for an Odyssey cornet which again I coult not fault and was only sold alongside the Packer tumpet for the bill I mentioned. I have literally just purchased a Trevor James Renaisance TJR4500 and after a couple of day I see no probelms.

    I believe there are a number of factor at work. Cheap Chinese horns are indeed doubtful although not horrendous, I have found that the valves tend to need lapping but after that they are fine. Early chinese horns were nothing more than TSO's (trumpet shaped objects) and perhaps what we might call XenoPhobia (yes its a joke) In America especially it is easy to pick up second hand trumpets which are of better quality than a lot of chinese student horns so it has become a little fashionable to knock them (I'm not having a go at trumpetmason here, it is just general)

    Actually I am a little jealous as I would love a horn like yours but it is very difficult to work out import duties in this country.

    Enjoy the horn don't over analyse, just play that sucker
     
  7. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    This is true when learning on any new horn, upgrade or just N+1, it takes quality time together.
    As for valves on a new horn, thin oil, and lots of it up front.....
    I recently had my Committee's valves redone, and they have soaked up tons of Hetman's #1...as time goes on, it takes less oil, and i have been relearning how to play it.
    You will find as you play consciously or sub-consciously you will notice your new horn sounding better, doing things you want it to do.
    As I have started to collect N+1 horns, the enjoyment comes from them all when you spend the time with them.
    It will come, give it the time it needs.
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    That's about a 14 mile stretch around DC. Once upon a time, I lived in 4 corners, Langley Park, West Hyattsvile, and Oxon Hill MD. Even taught two years in Bladensburg MD as was the straw that broke that idea of mine and my jump into a LEO career. What the Docs say about valves is correct, but IMO such applies to all horns, old or new. The valves are crucial! If they don't perform well, neither will you.
     
  9. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    "...I believe there are a number of factor at work. Cheap Chinese horns are indeed doubtful although not horrendous, I have found that the valves tend to need lapping but after that they are fine. Early chinese horns were nothing more than TSO's (trumpet shaped objects) and perhaps what we might call XenoPhobia (yes its a joke) In America especially it is easy to pick up second hand trumpets which are of better quality than a lot of chinese student horns so it has become a little fashionable to knock them (I'm not having a go at trumpetmason here, it is just general)

    Actually I am a little jealous as I would love a horn like yours but it is very difficult to work out import duties in this country.

    Enjoy the horn don't over analyse, just play that sucker"[/QUOTE]
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    Thanks, believe me I will be enjoying this horn for quite a while. I know a bit about economics and bach can charge more for an instrument of equal quality of another less popular brand just because they can; a bach of the syle of horn I got would probably at least cost 1500, which I didnt have to fork out . Some people think american cars suck. Yes some do but there are also plenty of great american cars. I have had music teachers say that some chinese horns they bought play better then their bachs/yamahas. Were not talking tristar here; let me give you an example of some of the stuff coming out of china now
    I would say at least 2500 in the states trump.jpg . Well Im actually quite thankful chinese horns arent respected in the U.S even the more quality ones, It keeps the prices fair(haha); I wish BMW's werent respected cars in the U.S and Kia's were
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    I bought the very bottom of the line Eastman trumpet about 3 years ago ($440 new) and never noticed that it needed any more oil than any other horns I have. I did notice the valves are nice, and the horn has held up beautifully in this three year period. I seriously doubt that your valves will "degrade" quickly (nonsense).

    Try Ultra Pure oil. Make sure you are "flooding" the valve with oil, and not just giving it a few drops (which could be your problem).


    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
    Cornyandy likes this.

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