Transitioning From A beginners trumpet to a Professional One

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RicardoStalwart, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. tjcombo

    tjcombo Mezzo Forte User

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    Your choice of Al Cass oil is the most likely reason that you have to oil the valves frequently. This is not such a bad thing. I use Cass for all but really worn old instruments which need thicker oil. A couple of drops the first time you get the instrument out each day is a good habit to develop (JMHO).
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I'm up in the Columbia area.

    Mike
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    This is an extreme example, but please bear with me, it serves to illustrate a point I think is often missed.

    It's possible you'll never have the dubious pleasure of accompanying a band of Great Highland Bagpipes. I'm not sure 'tuning' is quite the right word, but in the absence of anything better they're tuned to something a little above C#. They're not chromatic, or tunable in any sense we would recognise, and therefore only play a single and unique modal scale they have the nerve to call 'Key of D'.

    For a Bb brass accompaniment this translates (as I remember it) to a slightly sharp F major with A and E lipped down a quarter-tone or so.

    Okay, it's an extreme example, but learning how to adjust your intonation on the fly to that of the instruments around you is a vital part of the early learning process if you want to become someone who good players are happy to share a stage with.

    And this skill is best learnt by playing a poorly tuned instrument, that you constantly have to work at. Starting off with a professional standard instrument (leaving aside other playability issues) will not teach you this skill, because your instrument is doing the hard work for you. "So what?" you ask. So 10 years down the line, you join a good band and five minutes into the first session a seasoned old pro digs you in the ribs and says "Hey, watch your intonation, pal!". And now you're up the proverbial without a paddle, because it's now a bit late to start learning.

    So "the things I used to do to compensate for old fashioned mouthpieces and beginner horns" are not bad habits; they're the essential basis for mastery of ensemble playing, and most definitely NOT to be discarded just because you have a fancy new horn with 'great intonation' (and whatever they tell you, no trumpet really has a natural intonation any better than 'nearly acceptable')

    Eventually, the time comes when you can find all the notes, your ears are trained to pick up the almost bag-pipe like idiosyncracies of the oboe,and you want to be able to concentrate on the actual musical interpretation rather than sweating your nuts off on correcting gross tuning faults. Then is the time to start thinking about upgrading. Pity so many players do this too early. And as stated by others, great players don't NEED great instruments to sound great!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2013
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    AND Mike I'll be in your area again the first week of December. Better start working on a gig for that weekend. Would LOVE to hear my favorite TrumpetMD live ya known!
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Absolutely!

    Bring your horn.

    Mike
     
  6. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    I ACTUALLY AGREE WITH YOU ; DAVE MONETTE WOULDNT HAVE MADE THOSE PITCH CENTER HORNS/ MOUTHPIECES THAT PEOPLE LOVE IF HE DIDNT DEAL WITH THE HORNS WHERE YOU HAVE TO MAKE SOME HEAD/HORN ADJUSTMENT to. Change registers.

    I think my challenge will be learning how to play different horns/ mouthpieces. A lot of people disapprove, but some of my favorite trumpet players use different mouthpieces and horns for different situations. I like how light (lbs)and bright my first horn is ; I would like to be able to use both but for now I gotta get acquainted with this horn; just a few weeks before the jazz band.is back up.

    Ambrose akinmusire when of my favorite jazz artists said his 57 Martin comitee "is terrible..the valves stick" but he manages to get a lot of shapes and colors out of that thing.I wish the same for my self ; I'm very interested in the different textures and sounds that horns can make.
     
  7. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    Well that's true I wish I new a lot more about valve oil; I thought there was low quality high quality ; or thick -thin ; I used one thinner oil for my older horn and it worked well but I accidently spilled it and never used any thing but Al Cass since ; I think I need to expiriment with a few others and see what works best somebody recommended UltaPure, I will probably try that as well
     
  8. RicardoStalwart

    RicardoStalwart Pianissimo User

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    Columbia's awesome ; I work in that area - I was so close to getting free lessons at Howard Community college through my job. (Sigh)
     
  9. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I had a similar experience a friend with a top end Bach Strad borrowed my Packer 251 sp trumpet. Loved it and bought one for out door gigs, it has now replaced the bach as the favoured horn.

    Where abouts on the web did you find your current horn and the cool looking on on your reply to my post please.

    Cheers

    A
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013

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