Transposing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by breakup, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    I'm lousy at transposing on the fly, but do okay if I write it down ahead of time. I'm still an add sharp,subtract flat type though:oops:
     
  2. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    This should not be overthought. This is not string theory physics.
    Transposing takes practice and work. One of the reason C trumpet became the main orchestra horn is the relative ease of transposition. There are ways such as movable clefs, intervals, and the worst, using your ear.
    Go into an orchestra and play Strauss' Don Juan and see how nasty a transposition can be if you are using a Bb. It is in E major, meaning you go up an augmented 4th. That isn't so easy when you find an accidental. C trumpet puts it in a more manageable key, E major, the key the pieces is in.
    There are occasions where a singer prefers one key over the original, meaning unless new parts are available, everybody transposes.
    Rich T.
     
  3. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I believe I read somewhere that Doc Severinsen would call out "Key of E" to his band as a signal to play something western themed. I wonder was that some sort of in-joke because Emaj looks like F#maj to Bb horn players?

    --bumblebee
     
  4. Sidekick

    Sidekick Mezzo Piano User

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    I struggle with the whole transposing thing. Are there any good basic books or websites on the subject?
     
  5. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Ah, yes, Bumblebee. Indeed he did. For those folks, that was as easy as pie.
    That is why mastering scales in every key, including blues scales, and all modes are a requirement in trumpet study.
    To me, F# is not difficult. B major is a bit more problematical, especially starting on B below the staff. On many Bb horns, the pitch can get quite squirrely and the fingerings are slightly awkward.
    Back in music school, part of earning various proficiency diplomas was to play scales in any key that was asked. Major or minor. They were never difficult for me because I practiced them. A mastery of scales can and does help in transposition.
    Rich T.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Some reprieve is that he didn't call Key of B instead of E. I can't play concert keys of F# and C# on a Bb trumpet. The truth is I've never seen music in concert keys of F# an G# ... If there is any.
     
  7. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    :thumbsup:
     
  8. dangeorges

    dangeorges Pianissimo User

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    Writing it down ahead of time is transposing in advance, and then essentially reading what's written. You're just doing all the heavy lifting without the horn in your hand.
     
  9. Buck with a Bach

    Buck with a Bach Fortissimo User

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    Well, it does take some of think time part of it out of the equasion:dontknow::oops:
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Ernst Sach's 100 Etudes for Trumpet is kind of the standard. Basically, we start with diatonic pieces and later more chromatic pieces. It can be done as well with any easy etude books. When practicing Clarke, I like to read the first line and transpose chromatically up (the fingers have the licks memorized already, so it becomes more of a reading exercise).
     

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