Transposing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by breakup, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    If you play in a rock/pop band, you've played in (trumpet) F# and B all the time. And often improvising in those keys, to boot.
     
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  2. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    There are a handful of orchestral piece in F# major.
    Messiaen's massive Turangalila Symphony is mostly in F# and what is available in Mahler's 10th is also in F# major. Lizst's Hungarian Rhapsody #2 and Korngold's Symphony Opus 40 is also in F# major.
    When you step into an orchestra and they are handing out parts you've not played before and they are not for Bb or C trumpet, you will be forced to sight transpose on the spot.
    I would at one time "write out" the parts and realized it took as long to write it than it did to learn it by transposing it.
    Rich T.
     
  3. Rocksham

    Rocksham New Friend

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    My wife plays piano and I guitar. We just bought an old trumpet and in the process of restoring it. We are both still "buzzing"! Haven't received the valve kit yet.

    We plan on playing together at home. Piano and trumpet; guitar and trumpet for our own enjoyment.

    Question? Since open is a b flat, why don't we just learn the fingering as open is b flat? etc., etc.

    Makes sense to me. We are retired and have time to transpose, but why? I doubt we will be concert players. However, we may get good enough to play at church. Which is also in c.

    Thanks for this forum. I have already learned some about slides and valves!
     
  4. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    As many others have said, playing in Church from the Hymnal is great practice, and in fact can become second nature. Funny story, once for special music, three of us got up to do a piece written for trumpets, and having just been transposing for several hymns, my buddy on the left played the first note up a step automatically. Didn't sound too good, needless to say.
     
  5. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    I think you mean add two sharps, subtract two flats, rather than one of each.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    There's no reason not to do it exactly as you want. You just have to remember that any basic fingering charts will have been transposed for Bb trumpet, so as you first learn them, you'll actually have to transpose them.

    Also, learning to look at a written C for piano, guitar, etc, and fingering 1, etc. will mean that you will not be able to play in any ensembles that have parts written in transposed Bb. If you learn the "concert" fingerings and later get into any community bands, for example, or play in church with more than one trumpeter and with Bb music, you're going to have to learn reading/fingering all over again. (Or write out new parts transposed from Bb to your system of fingering, which is time consuming and which is requiring you to transpose, anyway.)

    I think you'd save yourself a lot of grief if you just got a C trumpet.
     
  7. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    When I started to play in church we were using "Hymns Ancient and Modern" book, it seemed that the majority were written in concert E, F# for the Bb trumpet, buying a C made life much easier, later we changed to "The Australian Hymn Book" where most were in Eb and D, easier keys for the congregation to manage.

    Playing French horn in Orchestra I play F parts on the Bb side and have learned a different set of fingering, that does the transposition without having to think.

    The older classical music has horns in all kinds of keys and can change key in the middle of a movement, keeps one on the toes.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Dog gone it! Many composers have written very specific changes from bass clef to tenor clef. I'm usually OK on euph to a 3rd line B in the tenor clef with my euph. On the other hand, I've often transposed the entire bass clef to the tenor clef to be played on trumpet, flugel, or F mellophone, sometimes even 8va.

    Really wouldn't be much of a problem to kick alto down to bass clef for euph and it sure does clear room in accompaniment for a clear trumpet or soprano / alto vocal solo.
     
  10. Rocksham

    Rocksham New Friend

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    Amen! Been thinking of that.
     

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