Tried a valved trombone

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jladams, Mar 31, 2011.

  1. jladams

    jladams New Friend

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    Sep 5, 2010
    Georgia, USA
    Playe a valved trombone at my local instrument store today. Came straight home and pickup my cornet and the mouthpiece felt about the size of a straw. It's a Curry 1DC, by the way.

    It was a real challenge to play that trombone. The last time I played a low brass instrument was 1990-91 and it was a school tuba I borrowed just for fun.

    Jack
     
  2. The Dutch Guy

    The Dutch Guy Piano User

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    Sep 22, 2008
    Netherlands
    I know the feeling...
    I've bought a valve-trombone not so long ago, and I had no problems playing it AFTER my trumpet, but the other way around is just impossible for me. Maybe it'll change the more you practise, but it feels just wrong.
     
  3. jladams

    jladams New Friend

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    Sep 5, 2010
    Georgia, USA
    I am thinking about buying it. It is a yamaha, but I don't know which model. It does not have a slide, just the valve body. It has a terrible concert F partial though. That's not just my observation, but also the opinion of the owner of the shop it is at. The only reason I consider buying it is because it is only $300. I figure it would be good enought to decided if I want to get a better valved trombone later. I really wanted a bass trumpet but they seem to be quite expensive, and it doesn't seem many companies are making them either.

    Jack
     
  4. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

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    I lucked into an old Olds Valve trombone (also has the slide) for 125.00 about 20 years ago. Not too bad, but a LOT easier to play higher with the slide than the valves.
     
  5. brassplayer

    brassplayer Pianissimo User

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    May 6, 2009
    San Gabriel, CA
    I'm the same way. High Brass followed by Low Brass generally works pretty well for me. But trying to play trumpet after playing trombone or tuba, can be tough.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I agree that high to low is easy even with a sled on a hill, but going back up is more difficult but can be done ... and gets a little easier the more often one does it. The advantage, a stated elsewhere, is that the larger mpcs of the bass instruments tend to strengthen the lips and facial muscles. I had become pretty much a regular on the switch back and forth between cornet / trumpet and "bone / euph" playing a 6 1/2 AL on both the latter. Still, I cannot remember a switch back up to my P5-4 picc (as uses a cornet mpc), and I don't believe my memory has failed me on this as I did not acquire my picc until 2006. Even so, I wouldn't declare it impossible.
     
  7. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    The mouthpiece changes do get easier the longer you play them. I've had to go back and forth from trumpet to euphonium to French horn to flugelhorn all in one night on many occasions. Probably would've killed me if I hadn't been doing it for a couple of years! But yeah, you get used to it with time!

    Kujo
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    While I remind all that due to health / dental issues I do not presently have the capability to play any of my horns, still I have the ability to play them all from picc to suzy. The exceptions I'll make is that I've never played a C, or Eb/D trumpet, bass trumpet, or flugelhorn but give me 30 days to get any fingering changes down pat and I wouldn't forsee a problem. Yes, I agree the more one becomes a switcheroo player, the easier it becomes. For the horns I've played, it has become nearly second nature, and I don't think much about it. To reiterate, I'm now on track to again put a horn to my lips by late May. What my sound will be like then, after having been near 3 years not playing is a different story. I did it after a 40+ year lapse, and I expect no more difficulty in time.
     
  9. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Agree with the views above; the more you play and swap, the easier it gets.

    I remember my first move to deeper brass, it was a Bass Trumpet. Exactly as you described; After Bass Trom and back to trumpet it was like blowing into a straw. But the more you play the easier it gets. About 2 weeks to adjust. Now it makes no difference, just play the Valve Trom and enjoy it. Try to get to read the Bass Clef as well, so you can play with a Trombone section. That is an area I have to be better at.

    ps Ed great to see you getting closer to the comeback...stay with it!
    Cheers
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The biggest problem in the bass clef is that it is usual that such is scored in the concert key of C. Otherwise, think of the concert C on the first ledger line below the treble clef as a "middle C" just as a pianist does.

    OK, now reverse the alphabet so that a B is in the space below the above "middle C", and below this B on the top line of the bass clef is an A. I'll skip ahead to tell you the lowest line of the bass clef is a G and the first space is an A.

    Next you transpose for your instrument vis a tenor trombone is also a Bb instrument as is a baritone and most euphoniums. Such is: add two sharps to the key signature and raise the note two semi-tones (one step).
     

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