trigger trumpets

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ltg_trumpet, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. ltg_trumpet

    ltg_trumpet Mezzo Piano User

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    Jan 21, 2009
    ive heard of trumpets with 1st and 3rd slide triggers, are they useful? thanks.
     
  2. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    Yes, they are useful for helping to bring certain notes in tune. However, I prefer the rings and or saddles which I feel I have better control over. It is rather difficult with a trigger to determine how far the slide has been thrown. I am sure some folks can do it very successfully, but I prefer the rings or saddles.
     
  3. Labidochromis

    Labidochromis Pianissimo User

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    Jan 7, 2009
    Armstrong BC.

    I agree about feel, I have tried a couple of horns with triggers and they just feel awkward.

    Mechanically they are another group of parts that can break.

    Cheers!

    :cool:
     
  4. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Michigan
    Well I spent most of my time just lipping the notes into tune as did most people. That being said I like triger's of saddles and rings but they are seldom seen due to cost. It cost's more to build a trumpet that way so you do not see it often. You adjust the linkage ont he triger system to move the slide the aproximate amount you need when fully depressed and they are normaly spring loaded to return. It really does not take that much movement of the slide. I especialy hate 1st valve saddles but that is what you get free now days!!! I also hate the ajustable 3rd valve aranagment we see so much of. Seriously how often do we have midget's and pituatary giants playing a Bb trumpet. The adjustable set up always looks bad on any trumpet not the nice clean look of just haveing a nice simple clean ring permanantly affixed tot he slide.
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Maryland
    I have a trigger on my 1st slide. It's nice in some ways. But overall, I like the saddle better. What I don't like is that the trigger needs to be under tension through a spring. This means I have to use a little bit of force to extend the 1st slide, which causes the trumpet to jerk a little.
     
  6. study888

    study888 Mezzo Forte User

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    I have often wondered about those spring loaded triggers myself. Thanks for the info. One of the features I like on my older King Liberty's is all that extra pull slides. On third valve slide you have a extra slide option. Now I know it is mostly for playing in key of A. But like the older vintage Conn's with the longer slides. You can adjust these Libertys on the low D and F# etc, to easly lip the lower notes. I agree a fixed ring on third slide is much better and better looking than a adjustable finger ring. The Callett Sima has all these extra features built into the horn,no first slide saddle needed,which I do not like.
     
  7. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    I guess that I have to be the oddball 'again'. My prime trumpet is a Conn 2B New World Symphony that was built with a first valve trigger and an underslung third valve fixed ring. I MUCH prefer a spring loaded trigger for first valve slide actuation. To squeez is a more natural muscular movement than to extend, as must be done with a saddle.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Maryland
    Yes, I agree that squeezing seems more natural. However, when I want to extend both the 1st and 3rd valves (like for a low C#), I have to extend my middle finger and squeeze my thumb. This doesn't seem as natural.

    Mike
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Germany
    It is like comparing shoes with strings to ones with velcro fasteners or just plain loafers.

    The biggest difference is that the trigger moves the slide at a mechanically more sensible position (at the middle of the bow). A saddle applies the energy only on one side. Everything else being equal, the trigger will cause less slide wear, but as it is mechanical too, require more attention.
     
  10. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I have a trigger on my Bach cornet and I don't like. first and third combinations are hard and I can't adjust how far out the slide goes with the trigger. It's out or in.
    Usually to adjust a 1&2 or an A I just pull out a little. With an F I pull farther. I can't do that with the trigger.
     

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