Triple Tonguing Advice

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by DRS, Mar 15, 2007.

  1. DRS

    DRS New Friend

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    Oct 23, 2005
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    Does anyone have some good advice and technique on how to speed up triple tonguing for pieces like the Grand Russian Fantasia?

    That 116 tempo is brutal, and it seems that getting there with a light and precise tongue won't happen with T-K tonguing.

    Thanks in advance for input.

    DRS
     
  2. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

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  3. Alex Yates

    Alex Yates Forte User

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    Try da-da-ga. Over the course of a week practice this section of the Russian Fantasy with a metronome. Start with quarter = 100. If that feels comfortable, knock it up to 104. If that feels like the top of your game, knock it up to 106 or 108 and play through it even if you keep falling behind or sound tangled up. Now, drop it back down to 104. It should feel a bit easier after attempting 108. That is a session for the day. The next day, begin at 104 and work through a notch or two higher on the metornome the same way I described for the first day. By the end of a week you should be close to your goal. This is how I work through exceptionally fast triple tongue passages like "Alborado del Gracioso" or the Jolivet Concertino (quarter = 136!)

    Make sure the air stream is supported and straight and let the tip of the tongue barely flick across it. That is all you need. Da-da-ga has more of a "skipping a rock across water" feeling than Ta-ta-ka. To keep your air stream straight and supported, imagine you are playing nice, big whole notes as you are triple tonguing your way through.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2007
  4. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    The way I built fluency with multiple tongue is different than pretty much everyone else, but it works for me and I've used it with students.

    I practiced it at three speeds daily:

    1 - Slowly, WELL within single tongue speed, but using the TTK sylables. Try to make the T and K sound alike. It won't happen in a day, but it'll come.

    2 - Meduim. This is the speed that your can sound you very best at. Use a particular metronome mark if you want, but only for reference. You need to find the optimal speed by listening and not by fitting yourself to a tempo (you can do that when you practice a solo). Just don't go faster than you can really sound good.

    3 - Fast! Now intentionally go faster than you really can. It'll sound kind of lousy, and you don't want to spend too much time with this, but I've found it to be important to really push it each day.

    The slow and fast will eventually help the medium to be clearer and faster. I don't have a set order to do everything, just get it all in and pretty soon you'll notice improvment. I've played the Russian Fantasy, it's a lot of fun!

    Jason.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Fast triple tongueing is less physically, conciously moving the tongue as letting it "ride on the airflow".
    Practicing just the K part helps a lot. Just replace ALL "t"s with "k"s for a week (only when practicing - band or orchestra rehearsals need to sound better......). Your double and triple tongueing will improve dramatically if you can survive the frustration of the first couple of days! You learn to lighten up and that makes the rest MUCH easier.
     
  6. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
    An interesting subject; I've come to sense that I have a "heavy" tongue compared to some when triple tonguing. I just can't for the life of me figure out how they can get so fast and still keep it "sharp and clean". I'm a T-K-T type.

    Just plain 'ol practice and repetition? I like the idea of daily practice with a bit of a push to the upper end of the range.
     
  7. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    The lightness comes from economy of motion, at least for me. The less back and forth there is the lighter I can play. I like Rowuk's "riding on the airflow" idea. I've also practiced by using the air and tongue alone trying to keep the air constant and not let it back up on the K. Speaking the sylables out loud can be helpful too.
     
  8. DRS

    DRS New Friend

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    Oct 23, 2005
    Kalispell, MT
    Thanks for the advice! It's great stuff, and worked well.
     
  9. DRS

    DRS New Friend

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    Oct 23, 2005
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    Thanks! This worked very well. Your advice is greatly appreciated!
     
  10. DRS

    DRS New Friend

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    Oct 23, 2005
    Kalispell, MT
    Thanks. I'm going give all this great advice a whirl!
     

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