Trumpet characteristics/features and efficiency

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bwanabass, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    IMO, alone, as in sitting on a stand, no brass instrument has any efficiency regardless of all its technical specifications. Efficiency, if at all it exists, is only in the knowledge and skills of a player and their familiarity with whatever brass instrument they chose to play, and even then there lays so many variables it is impossible to discern.
     
  2. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

    4,813
    2,998
    Dec 19, 2009
    Hillsborough, NJ
    With all due respect, I'm not sure the responses are perhaps missing the intent of the OP? Doc, (gmonady) do you have anything to add to this? He can speak on this, trust me.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Still, IMO, it all boils down to the instrument being able to produce the sound the player wants the easiest for him/her. Surely, for a beginner that would not be a custom made instrument or even one of recognized vintage excellence, thus one must factor in the players ability and weigh whether or not they can afford such. I ponder just how many players are washed out and quit just by the adamant insistence of the band director that they acquire a specific instrument that is too expensive for them.
     
  4. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

    136
    80
    May 27, 2014
    chicago
    with all due respect to the learned posts here, i think in the casual sense that the word might be used among players who are looking for a certain type of horn, the word "efficient" might refer to a trumpet that responds quickly and feels to the player as though it would be easily heard without him working harder than he needed to. in a broader sense, it might also refer to the ease in which a player could produce the sound he was after on a certain horn. but as soon as you go there, you have to ask "what sound might that be?" there was recently a post from someone asking about a rotary trumpet. one of the replies contained a story of a schilke player who got a job and germany and had to switch to a much heavier rotary trumpet, and didn't care for it at all. it was very difficult for him to play after his schilke. one could say he was used to a much more "efficient" trumpet ie, one that blew easier. i'm not sure that would be using the word correctly in the scientific sense, but most of the time, it would get a certain idea accross to another trumpet player.
     
  5. Honkie

    Honkie Pianissimo User

    175
    125
    Feb 22, 2013
    I think trumpet players can be efficient, but not trumpets.
    Well-designed, well-constructed horns are easier to play efficiently....but it's the player's efficiency, not the horn's.

    There is a particular horn manufacturer whose branding strategy seems to hinge on confusing this exact issue.
     
  6. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

    1,491
    587
    Aug 9, 2004
    Santa Cruz County, CA
    I think it's quite possible to measure and maximize the acoustic efficiency of a trumpet. Dr. Arthur Benade gave us a laboratory model for measuring the energy going into the mouthpiece versus the sound energy emerging from the bell. You can even track the resonance peaks and make design compromises to make the intonation usable.

    However, I don't think most players would think such a design was efficient at all. By this measure of efficiency, as much sound as possible would be projected forward, with as little as possible going back. This would be a trumpet that projected as much as possible, while offering the least amount of feedback to the player. With minimal feedback, the player would probably unconsciously play louder and louder, trying to hear something, and conclude that the horn was a stuffy, exhausting, inefficient beast.

    Of course, the environment you play in affects this too. I believe that's what Rowuk is talking about when he uses the examples of playing outdoors versus in a tiled bathroom.
     
  7. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,331
    4,732
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    This is the normal scientific understanding of the term efficiency, but I must say that the full relevance of this factor escapes me. Even in my fairly pathetic current state, I can get through 5 or 6 hours of steady practise without collapsing into a breathless heap. Okay, it's not continuous above stave blasting, but how many of us, if we're in reasonable shape actually become exhausted during playing?

    If anything, I probably would benefit health-wise from more of a good aerobic workout while I practise than less. So for most of us mere mortals, what is the problem with playing a scientifically inefficient instrument?
     
  8. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    Since the nodes inside the horn move with pitch
    (I believe higher notes move their outer node further out in the bell)
    this should contribute to keep them in tune, or have I misunderstood?

    Isn´t the prolem with tuning exactly what the manufacturers should fix anyway?
    Compensating bad tuning with less efficiency seems like a poor deal . . .
     
  9. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    Since the nodes inside the horn move with pitch
    (I believe higher notes move their outer node further out in the bell)
    this should contribute to keep them in tune, or have I misunderstood?

    Isn´t the prolem with tuning exactly what the manufacturers should fix anyway?
    Compensating bad tuning with less efficiency seems like a poor deal . . .
     
  10. Sofus

    Sofus Forte User

    1,529
    17
    Jul 26, 2008
    DP (guess what it means!)
     

Share This Page