Trumpet characteristics/features and efficiency

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Bwanabass, Jun 5, 2014.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,609
    7,946
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    no, the trumpet is not efficient in that case, the player is stupid for being the lesser of the two partners.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,609
    7,946
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Please do not equate "easy to hear" with better!

    Like I said, accomplished players use more of the room sound to shape their playing than weak players. For a strong player, a horn that does not leak as much energy can be an asset. Thin bells, light bracing light horns all leak more energy. Good for some, limiting for others.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,609
    7,946
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Nope, it was there all the time. The difference is the side of the horn that you are on when thinking about stuff like this. Output is not only what comes from the inside of the bell.

    When teaching, it is easy to observe which students play out into the room or play into a corner. It is easy to hear what type of player falls apart in a specific playing venue. That is why Practice is not Practice.
     
  4. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

    136
    80
    May 27, 2014
    chicago
    once again rowuk has brought up an important point. i don't think anybody can play very well when they can't hear themselves, and this device would seem to help that. the tricky thing is that we can't hear what the listener hears. so our equipment choices have to be informed not only by what is satisfying for ourselves, but what produces a satisfying sound for the audience. any large ensemble playing has this as one of its components, not only loud rock bands. in the case of an amplified horn section, the sound that reaches the microphone is what is amplified to the listener. since the microphone is close to the bell, a large volume of sound is not necessarily the goal. in my experience, microphones tend to "like" compact, bright sounding instruments. i think in any lead type of situation, one of the requirements of the quality of sound is that the upper partials in the sound are present in order to take the sound of the trumpet out of the over-saturated mid-range to where it can be distinguished easily. almost any horn will reach this point if pushed hard enough. but to be "efficient" in the sense that we might be talking about here, pushing a dark horn to the volume level required to achieve that result could be considered extra, and largely unnecessary effort. a bright sounding trumpet that reached that point easily, and in fact reminded the player not to overplay by becoming resistant when overblown, would seem to be an intelligent place to start. these instruments tend to share certain design characteristics, which i believe was the point of the op's question.
     

Share This Page