Trumpet Cleaning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by deano56, Dec 15, 2013.

  1. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    It is positively stupid!
     
  2. PiGuy_314

    PiGuy_314 Pianissimo User

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  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I made it to 1:36 and just couldn't take it! He should be BEAT by the horn he just ruined!
     
  4. dizzyizzy

    dizzyizzy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 27, 2006
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    Best gizmo I found for giving a trumpet a bath...is a long, rectangular plastic window flower pot (like would go out on a deck). IF it has holes in the bottom...epoxy or silicon to seal them. But its a bit longer than any trumpet...is about 7-8 inches deep and allows the horn to just rest in the bath and soak...nothing to ding the horn or scratch it. cheap, but very effective. - dizzyizzy
     
  5. jengstrom

    jengstrom Pianissimo User

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    This may be very true. However, my warhorse of an elementary school band teacher taught us how to clean our trumpets and cornets. He would lend me his snake every few months and I would clean my Getzen up. I don't know what the heck I ate as a kid, but the green stuff that came out of that horn... wow! And even as a 5th grader, I could tell it played a lot better afterward.

    As a side note, he also showed us how to work creases back to shape using a drum stick (sort of like a rolling pin). I actually had to do that a few years later to my brand new Olds Special after I bent the bell when I whacked the corner of my case reaching for valve oil.

    I doubt many band teachers teach that stuff any more.
    -John
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    John, I concur, although I was likewise taught by my instructor. Then, it was do so regularly or not be in band class much longer ... when one's instrument didn't function properly ... and during WWII you were very lucky to even have an instrument as they were strategic metals.
    Too, I was extremely lucky to have an available tech who was 4F classified and unable to be drafted into the armed services. We then pulled Fuller brushes on cords through our instruments, but it was difficult to thread the cord.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Post construction valves shouldn't need lapping, but I have worked dry valves (fingering 0-123 while watching professional wrestling on TV) on new horns.
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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  9. deano56

    deano56 New Friend

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    Nov 23, 2013
    Morris, IL.
    Nice horn in that link above, what kind is it?
     

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