Trumpet/Cornet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by tutin_trumpeta, May 14, 2008.

  1. tutin_trumpeta

    tutin_trumpeta Pianissimo User

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    Apr 10, 2008
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    I play both trumpet and cornet regularly now however, because I've played predominantly cornet for the past 10 months (due to circumstances rather than choice), I sound like a cornet player playing the trumpet. Ideally, I would like a cornet tone when I play cornet and trumpet tone when I play trumpet, I know it's going to take a lot of practice but does anyone have any tips?

    Thanks in advance,

    Nick
     
  2. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    What mouthpieces are you using? Is your "cornet" sound on the trumpet a question of tone, color, and harmonics? Or is it one of playing style - hard to put into words, but I guess I mean, is it your approach?
    What music are you playing when you sound cornetish?
     
  3. tutin_trumpeta

    tutin_trumpeta Pianissimo User

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    I'm currently playing on a 1 1/4C on my trumpet and a David King custom on my cornet.



    I think it's a case of playing style with a little bit of tone, colour and harmonics - I hadn't noticed it myself, and still don't even though I'm listening for it, it was my teacher that pointed it out.



    It was after a lesson on the Haydn and Bussers Andante et Scherzo. I'm working towards my grade 8 at the moment but it's the only trumpet playing I'm doing at the moment (I wish it was more but it's circumstances)
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Did you ask your teacher what he meant? HE'S the one who noticed it.

    It is probably hard to hear the difference from behind the bell, although if it is style you might. The 1 1/4C is a a biggish piece, but not so big to darken the color a lot. However, a smaller one (maybe just a shallower cup) might give you a more brilliant tone. You didn't elaborate much on the size/cup of your King.

    You might want to listen to a recording of the Haydn and see if you can tell what is missing from your rendition.

    What kind of music were you playing on the cornet?
     
  5. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Hi!

    I assume that you are doing your cornetplaying in a BrassBand since you are located in UK?

    If I am right, Brass Banders (like me, flugel) has often a problem when switching from cornet or flugel to the trumpet. Our problem is often that we are used to play in a cornet or horn section, and our ears and brains are connected with the (soft) BB sound. When shifting from the cornet or flugel, our ears have problem to accept the different sound of the trumpet.

    It could be a good idea to change the mouthpiece, as veery715 suggests, just to let the trumpet force you to accept the real sound of the trumpet, as a very deep mpc makes the trumpet sound "softer" than a shallow one.

    Since you mention you are playing the Y Xeno with David King custom mpc, I was on a introduction of the Xeno in Bergen some years ago, where dr. King had a lecture about the cornet, and also actually showed us the different tone colours and projection by playing the cornet with different mpc cups and mpc materials.

    So it might be an idea to test different mpc'es to try this out?

    Remeber also: Cornet and trumpet are two different animals with different mentalilty...

    Good luck with your playing
     
  6. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    Your mouthpieces are pretty much the same as mine and they sound ideal for both styles of playing. I also have the same problem with switching, but what i have learnt from my own research into this issue is to get used to it. I don't think a shared rim would necessarily make it more comfortable, because the cornet mouthpiece after perlonged stints of playing tends to accomodate more lip inside.

    I think the solution is to play both each day. Nick Droz...(sorry nick) one of the professional trumpeters (played with Maynard) on this website includes all types of instruments into his daily practise, so maybe that is the way forward. Failing that you could do what Maurice Murphy used to do in his early days of playing the trumpet; use a cornet mouthpiece with a converter in your trumpet.;-)
     
  7. tutin_trumpeta

    tutin_trumpeta Pianissimo User

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    Apr 10, 2008
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    Unfortunately there isn't a size indicated on the mouthpiece it only says David King Custom.


    Thanks guys, I have a lesson this afternoon so I'll ask my teacher and I'll start incorporating both into my daily practice. Please keep replying as all help is greatly appreciated. I've been playing for 16 years but I still have a lot to learn!
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2008
  8. screamingmorris

    screamingmorris Mezzo Forte User

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    Apr 4, 2007
    I agree with 2 points that have already been raised.

    To get a trumpet sound on the trumpet you need to be using a trumpet mouthpiece that is significantly different from your cornet mouthpiece.
    Usually the trumpet mouthpiece should be shallower and with tighter throat / backbore.

    But your approach is most likely a major cause of the cornet sound on a trumpet.
    On a trumpet you need to be more aggressive in your approach, use more abdominal tension with greater air compression.
    When I switched from trumpet to cornet I had to dramatically change my approach, play more gently with more air, in order to get a good cornet sound.
    On cornet you should be gentle.
    On trumpet you should be more aggressive.

    By the way, that does not mean that there is inherently anything wrong with the way you sound on trumpet.
    It is quite possible that you have a *wonderful* tone and style that many of us would *love* to emulate.
    But the music director might want you to play with a different style or tone in order to please his own preference or to better blend with other trumpets.
    Example: Many people love the sound of Miles Davis, but his tone and style would not have fit in with the trumpet section of Maynard Ferguson's 1970's band.
    Just as Maynard's trumpet section's tone and style would not have fit in with Miles Davis' band.

    - Morris
     
  9. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Hi!

    Give the crowd an update whenever you feel for it :-)
     
  10. brassman

    brassman New Friend

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    Oct 28, 2008
    Well hello, I can say that I try to combine trumpet with cornet playing for three years now unsuccesfully I can say. Very disappointing. It just doesn't work.

    I am a trumpet player for all my life, and started to combine it with cornet when my orchestra transformed itself into in a real brassband. From that day one my trumpet playing has been going downwards: range, tone quality, endurance,...

    In my opinion, the trumpet and cornet are totally different instruments, in need for very specific approach each.

    A lot of people are not believing me and telling me it is "in my head": NOT!!!
    These people do not combine mouthpieces/instruments, so they do not know anything about it!

    The only people I know who can combine trumpet and cornet are professionals, or students in music, going for a professional career, and playing several hours a day. I do not have one example of an amateur who succesfully combines trumpet and cornet in my environment. I DO know a lot of people who combine flugel horn with trumpet, in my opion: a lot easier and do-able. I also have a flugel horn,and you play easily on that instrument.

    my opinion.
     

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