Trumpet Dilemma

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by GuitarPlayer05, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. GuitarPlayer05

    GuitarPlayer05 New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2008
    Lincoln, NE
    I have an old Bach 37 that I've had since I started college in 2005. The silver is wearing in the high trafffic locations and there is some pitting of the silver around the valve casing. The Question is do I get it re-silverplated or should I think of getting a new horn? The bach is a so-so instrument for me, but I want some change. I know that with the bach I could do heavy caps and a new lead pipe for cheaper than a new horn. If you were in my shoes what would you do?
     
  2. bobd0

    bobd0 Piano User

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    Jan 10, 2009
    How old is old? You mention you've had it since 2005 but is it a much older horn?

    For example, if it's an older New York Bach in decent playing condition you might be able to get enough for it to buy a new horn of your choice.
     
  3. GuitarPlayer05

    GuitarPlayer05 New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2008
    Lincoln, NE
    It's an 83, we bought it used off of e-bay for semi cheap and it's been a great horn, I pride my self on having the oldest Strad in the trumpet section. It was made in Elkhart, IN so not as old as yours.
     
  4. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    I'd take my horn and mouthpiece and head to a store like Dillons where one can play-test a whole slew of different trumpets. Go with an open mind, test as blindly as you can. If you can, take a friend, wear gloves, and a blindfold, and have your friend hand you intruments to play. Make sure your own horn is in the lineup.

    After doing that for several hours you will have a far better idea of which way to proceed - a new horn or not.


    veery
     
  5. bigdanv

    bigdanv Pianissimo User

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    Jan 13, 2009
    Connecticut
    It all depends on what you would change playing-wise about your trumpet. If the changes you'd like to make are small, then modifications may be the way to go. If you'd like to make significant changes, then a new horn might be the way to go. Veery gave some excellent advice regarding trying some new horns, if that's what you decide to do.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It all depends how important playing the trumpet is to you. If it is some side thing, buy a new guitar. If it is increasing in importance, do like Veery says and try it vs other instruments. A complete overhaul is about a grand. It may play a bit better afterwards, but it won't be night and day.
     
  7. GuitarPlayer05

    GuitarPlayer05 New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2008
    Lincoln, NE
    I do not need a guitar, I've almost stopped playing that instrument all together. I'm just going to have some money around and thought I would ask the opinions of fellow trumpeters. I've really started to love the trumpet and wish I would have spent more time with it when I had the time. I'm not in the market for a new trumpet yet, I just want opinions on whether I should try to find a new one, or "mod" the one I have.
     
  8. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    After reading your post a few times, I think the question you are asking is "do I get my Bach resilvered to make it look like new, or do I consider a new horn?"

    If you like the way your horn plays, check around and see what the cost of resilvering would cost. A chem clean and dinks removed would likely also be part of the process of resilvering. The horn would come back looking "like new."

    While there are those that argue on either side, I personally think the older Strads, in general, play much better than those made more recently (other than maybe in the last year). There is something to say for having an older Strad, especially if it is in good playing condition.

    If you aren't crazy about your horn, or feel there are characteristics other horns have that yours doesn't, then consider a new horn. All of the above give great advice. Play them, play them, play them. The more the better. After 2-3 days of trying new horns and going back to your old one, you will likely either decide you already have a winner, or wish to move on to one. Best of luck.

    Steve
     
  9. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I ditched my Bach and bought a new trumpet. My playing is a thousand times better now. The new trumpet is only a small part of it. (I mean the actual item) Learning about the trumpet and the people associated with it and just wanting to play. It all went together to make me a better player and, I have way more fun playing now.
     
  10. larry tscharner

    larry tscharner Forte User

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    Apr 30, 2010
    dubuque iowa
    Bachs have a great reputation but Ive noticed that you either love them or not, no so-so in-between. It sounds to me that you are torn between your pride for having a somewhat vintage horn but you are ready for something to renew your interest in playing. If you bought it right on EBAY and have no emotional attachment to it I think it may be time to play test some other horns like the very good advice that was given above. New horns are nice, I bought one a year ago, But if you still want an instrument with character consider a restored classic. You get a new feel with that "old car smell". Its exciting to go on a shopping safari. Take your time and try lots of brands and models. There are so many quality brands out there the possibilities are dizzy-ing! Have fun and realy dig into it, become a trumpet geek. I realy enjoyed my adventure and swear by my final choice. If this process takes you less than six months you rushed through it! Best wishes.
     

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