Trumpet graded exams

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetfart123, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I believe if you ask all four year of classes of the medical school students I teach as a Professor of Pediatrics, Internal Medicine and Clinical Psychology, they will tell you my exams are so difficult, that their weekend social lives have very much been interfered with. I believe I do have this right, as your lives are in their hands. I take my role in that dynamic very seriously.
     
  2. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Easy. Same colour as his right sock.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Most of the time, but not all the time. Met one and when asked why he wore socks of a different color told me he was color blind and just selected two socks that didn't have holes in them.
     
  4. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Hi BrassEye,

    I had a look at that link you sent me, and there are three levels ABRSMDip, LRSM & FRSM. Have you an idea of how long it takes to complete each level. I am doing my Grade 4 which I sit in November this year. From there I am wanting to complete each following exam in 6 months, this would mean I would be able to start the ABRSMDip in June 2016. Just curious as to how long these take.

    Many thanks
    Antony
     
  5. BrassEye

    BrassEye Pianissimo User

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    With the greatest respect, I think that your time frame for completing the other grades is optimistic, though not impossible. Don't forget you need G5 Theory of Music (or G5 Jazz, these days), or an equivalent recognised by ABRSM, to progress past G5 Practical. G6 Theory of Music is required for DipABRSM.

    DipABRSM is, I believe, held to be equivalent to the performance aspect of a first year Bmus degree, so that should give you some indication of the work involved. Your set pieces are frequently full concerti at diploma level, to be played to a very high standard. Many fine musicians don't bother to take the DipABRSM. Even fewer take the LRSM and FRSM; the latter in particular is a great deal of work. These are things that are most commonly done as professional development. Some do do them for fun (DipABRSM moreso than the others which are more work), but they're by no means necessary to work.

    Enjoy the learning experience and don't feel you have to just do exams; letters after your name don't make you a better player, necessarily. Play as many styles of music in as many groups with as many players who are better than you as you can. That will help you most.
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    My eldest son occasionally steps out with a young lady who was somewhat reluctant to meet school sock rules. She had drawer full of unpaired socks which she selected from each day and wore regardless of the colour mix. Very nearly got herself expelled because of her idiosyncractic stand. She's a talented musician too - sax, flute, and occasionally trumpet.

    I choose to wear my dress socks inside out - the level of comfort is quite enhanced as it puts the seam on the outside - and the inside of the sock is just as black as the outside. I recommend this scheme to you all.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2013
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Studies interfering with our lives on all levels is a sign of passion, as is pursuing where our passions lead us, and following rabbit trails is part of the process. My passion is trumpet, and how it works and how it is learned. I got to work with some dedicated professors in fields outside of music, learned that the best way of discovering the wonders in a library was to ask a librarian (passionate people themselves) and to turn myself over to my trumpet professor. I tried to find every shortcut in the book while studying; a few worked.

    The upshot is that the traditional way proves to be the best way; if something radical comes along outside the box of tradition it is quickly absorbed. The ABRSM program (and others like it in Europe) provide many good tools to make better musicians. It includes the box (although just scratching the surface). The pieces asked for are not impossible for a good amateur and worthy of a professional.

    Point is, the professional brings the experience of others onto the stage, and a diet of only "what tastes good" isn't effective enough to produce a total player. That is why the ABRSM has all that ancillary stuff in the curriculum.
     
  8. trumpetfart123

    trumpetfart123 Pianissimo User

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    Hi BrassEye,

    I am doing my theory class and exams in conjunction with my practical exams ect., not too fused about having letters after my name, as I am only doing this as a hobby. It's just that I think going through the formal route, is a great way of perfecting your craft to your best ability. However, your advise about playing with others is bang on. I am in my late forties, and have a boy who is just 6, so i dont get that many opportunities, but maybe they will arise later. I will put this off until my range improves, and I am more confident about playing in bands ect. I contacted ABRSM and they advised that it takes between 1.5 and 2 years for the DipABRSM, and longer for the following two, i would like to do these for a sense of personal achievement.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The comfortable thing about the ABRSM is that the tests are standardized and democratic. Gmonady mentioned the wicked tough tests he gives out; my Music History professor was equally as cruel. The joke was that a typical question of his was, "Define the universe and give three examples." A bit overstated, perhaps, but rather than giving us questions like "What were the dates of Tchaikovsky's birth and death," we were asked things like "What influences can you find in Tchaikovsky's music--what composers did he build on, and where did that take music." Wicked tough questions for a Doctoral candidate, and he encouraged that same depth of understanding in undergraduates who were more interested in putting in practice time and finding dates. In retrospect I'm incredibly grateful for his classes--they gave me an edge as a professional.

    I commend trumpetfart123 for pursuing the ABRSM exams, not in the pursuit of letters after his name, but for becoming a better player.
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The interesting outcome of this is that trumpetfart123 will have gained knowledge, physical capability, self satisfaction, AND even the dreaded letters - which serve little other purpose than to indicate to others his capacity to learn and meet standardised goals - he can chose to append them to his business card, or not, the letters become private property and can be wheeled out as necessary - I sometimes find mine almost as useful as giving some cocky little sod the bird.

    As to exams, I have created technical examinations for Aircraft Maintenance Engineers now for over 25 years - ours are, by regulation, multi-choice responses and I tend to ask questions that look simple but the answer options are each correct for the different airplanes the candidates work on each day - so they have a conundrum, not only do they need to know their subject for the airplane they are studying, but also that other aircraft, with which they should be familiar, and are sometimes just a tiny bit different. Often good exam technique is about attitude - like playing trumpet, it's all in how you attack the problem.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
    Vulgano Brother likes this.

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