Trumpet High Note Volume

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jazzy816, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. Jazzy816

    Jazzy816 Pianissimo User

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    Hiya! I am a junior in high school who (fittingly to this forum) plays trumpet! I recently got my braces off (5 months ago) and at the moment I can pretty regularly hit a G6 (one note away from a double A, just to clarify octave). Its usually not too spotty, however the volume on it isn't great. I was wondering if anyone has any tips for improving volume on notes in the high register, since it takes much faster air. Some days the G is an actual tone and other days its just a whistle, not a full note. Any help is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Jfrancis

    Jfrancis Pianissimo User

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    First, and foremost, a good teacher can help you lots with this. Barring this, don't get in a hurry. Do lip slurs such as the Chas. Colin, "Advanced Lip Flexibilities", or Walter Smith's, "Lip Flexibilities". Use strong amounts of air and thinking ahh-eee, ahh-eee.

    The reduced range is normal as you are adjusting to a "new mouth". This is a great opportunity to build up the right way. Practice only til tired. Put it down, rest up and do it again.

    You'll be screaming before you know it!
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Good 'ol long tones can help. Starting on c above the staff, play long tones with a crescendo from mf to fff and back again. Continue chromatically upwards to the g above c above the staff and back again. Practice also tonguing eighths or sixteenths, starting chromatically at g above the staff up the octave and back. By adding this to your usual routine you will soon own the g above c above the staff.

    Have fun!
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Open up your embouchure (the Phwooooo technique works great here) and practice, practice, practice, because like it or not, it takes work to build and then sustain the muscle you need to use to keep the control going.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    By the way Jazzy, welcome to TM.
     
  6. Jazzy816

    Jazzy816 Pianissimo User

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    In reply to Jfrancis about a teacher; I have a private teacher that I see every week. He focuses a lot on physical playing technique, things like chromatic, Clark studies, and complicated etudes. I enjoy him as a teacher and there's no doubt in his personal skill it's just this isn't the kind of thing he focuses on. I'm not saying I want to focus mainly on range; it's just not a part of our practice at all.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    In defense of your teacher, very little is ever written or played above G6. I've played commercial style praise and worship charts and the highest I've seen is a double Ab. If you're patient, practice, and do your long tones, it will happen. BTW, :welcome::welcome::welcome::wave::wave::wave::laughwave::laughwave::laughwave:
     
  8. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I gig all the time and the highest written notes I have are Fs above high C, and I think that there are only 2 in the whole book for 500+ charts. Rarely do I have anything higher than a written D - those are all over the place.

    While I think it would be great to have an additional 4th or so of usable range, I came to the realization and acceptance years ago that I may never get there, so I worked what I did have and went from there. I've never been a big band lead trumpet player, but I'm ok with that - 3rd and 4th parts are just as important to the whole, and I've done a boatload of gigging over the last 26 or 27 years, so it hasn't seemed to put to much of a damper on things.

    Just work what you've got, don't mess with the range stuff too hard unless you absolutely need to, and just work the heck out of your fundamentals down lower. Chances are, that's actually going to improve your upper register.
     
  9. cfkid

    cfkid Pianissimo User

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    I'm going to agree with VB. My teacher is a Claude Gordon direct student and we work on range every day. It's almost always an arpeggio up to a note, topping out at High C. We then work chromatically up from there. We also put a crescendo on the last night. Honestly I can peel paint with those notes now. My High G is pretty strong but I doubt I could play it in music. But I can easily hit the E and F now. At the start of this a year or so ago, I could barely play a high C.

    Also to echo what others have said, you won't use that range too much. My teacher says there are three registers. The pedal register, below low F#. The high register, above High C. And the cash register, everything in between. Make sure your pick the correct register on which to focus your time.

    Mark
     
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  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh come on... Go and octave higher. It will increase your FEV1 by 10%!:-P
     

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