Trumpet Lessons

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by isuckattrumpet, Sep 15, 2014.

  1. isuckattrumpet

    isuckattrumpet Pianissimo User

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    Hi friends,

    I am going on an international tour next summer with the youth orchestra that I'm in. The cost for the trip is nearly $5000. Let's just say my parents aren't very happy about it :lol:
    Anyway, they told me that I will have to get a job to help pay for the trip. I am a seventeen year old high school student and my options for jobs are limited to fast food restaurants and whatnot. But I came up with another idea... how about trumpet lessons? I was thinking something like $15/half hour. Does that sound reasonable? How would I even know if I'm a competent teacher? Or should I just discuss this with my own trumpet instructor first... :D

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Stick to the Fast Food outlet, Lumber yard, Labouring etc.

    A teacher that is not a teacher can leave a lot of problems in their wake, and affect the future of some younger players. You are not qualified to teach.
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    ISAT, yeah, I know, teaching one hour of lessons equals about four hours flipping burgers in terms of pay, but I'm going to suggest that you get a real part-time job.

    Frankly, I'm not sure you know enough about the trumpet to teach it properly, and I think your parents are expecting you to gain a valid life experience the old-fashioned way, flipping burgers, washing cars or some doing some other unglamorous job.
     
  4. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    I second the remarks already made.

    Teaching is a vocation, not a job.
     
  5. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    I agree with the others that teaching should not be seriously considered.

    If your only option is food service I'd strongly recommend staying away from flipping burgers. Being a waiter (even at a local Italian joint) will pay much better and be a better general life experience than being a "cook" at Burger King.
     
  6. isuckattrumpet

    isuckattrumpet Pianissimo User

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    To be honest I got the idea from other kids at my school, among them, a violinist, horn player, and a saxophone player, all my age or younger. But I will stay away from it.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I don't know of any restaurant server that is not 21 years of age, and that is due to the fact that most serve alcoholic beverages which the law mandates that underage cannot serve.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Busking... Try Busking... on a busy street corner. OR BETTER YET... Set up a grill... on a street cornor.... and state basking, while flipping burgers. You're your own boss... no one to share the income with (other than mom an pop to pay off the meat and buns expense up front)... two businesses... at the same time.... and man... You're in business.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Lawn service... There's money in grass.
     
  10. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    It's a sensible idea to stay away from teaching for now. As the other guys have said you probably don't have the experience yet. Teaching has to be three things. You have to love it for its own sake not just as a way to make money. It has to come from the voice of experience. It often has to find you. I started teaching for three reasons. I love teaching and workng especially children, there is nothing more rewarding to me than getting a youngster through the first faltering steps on a career in playing. I had already taught family members and a couple of friends kids to quite a high standard and found I had a knack for giving young players a solid foundation to build from. My teacher at the time suggested that with my experience and due to the fact he was learing as much from me as I was from him and knowing my drive to teach and my history musically thought I would be okay to do it. (I had about 25 to 30 years of playing under my belt at that time) but I was pushing towards another exam after playing very much within myself.
     

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