Trumpet Maker reflection

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrassOnLine, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

    Age:
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    Nov 22, 2007
    Spain
    Hello friends.
    This morning I received an email from a "famous" historical trumpet maker.
    Althoug I attended various trumpet making courses -which is the only activity of him currently- he wrote "please, don't tell you studied under me, you only attended to some of my trumpet making workshops".
    Well, as far as I know, that's the only chance to study with this man.
    I can't understand what the hell...
    I'm ashamed of the money I spent in this courses.
    In 2.004 -Rostock, Germany- I remember how I completed my trumpet in only one day and a half. Then I asked for the acids (were used in the Middle Ages) so they said: "no acids. Just sandpaper". Could you belive ??? All of us spent one week polishing our trumpets. When mounting the trumpets, we released that the tube of the bell bow was thinner than the bell bore (about 1 milimetre !!!), so tubes didn't fit. When a friend and I asked what happen, what to do, he said: "well, that's a good question. I'll think about". That was in 2004. Actually still waiting for the answer...

    So by now I'm proud to say I'm self-trained.
    I earned my Master in Trumpet Performence, as well as my Teaching Degree, my Phisycs-Acoustics prize in 1.998...
    I had worked for the Stomvi company in 1998, testing and designing new developments -but not in the workshop area-. I know about acoustics, I'm a good player... so the only thing I missed to start making trumpets was the skills I planed to learn from this two men (R.B & R. S.).
    Now they refuse to me. Great !!!
    I'm making historical trumpets since 2004, modern since 2007, and my customers are so happy.
    Well, I supose I'm self-trained. It means good things for me.
    Now, I teach trumpet making courses. But I'm always honest (I try, at least). All those who attend to them, are provided of REAL TOOLS, and I never let them down, for sure.
    Thanks to all.
    Supose I saved some bucks on a psiquiatryc... ;)
    Best wishes !!!
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Germany
    I would also probably ask my students or course members to make the same distiction. It is not an insult. To study under a MASTER is a much different thing than going to one of those courses where everybody builds the same basic model. The goal there is basic skills not real study of the original practices.

    Be proud of YOUR accomplishments. They are not denying you, they simply are not qualified to pass the true art down.
     
  3. BrassOnLine

    BrassOnLine Piano User

    Age:
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    Nov 22, 2007
    Spain
    Dear Robin,
    I made over 250 trumpets since 2004. The first 50 were sold at Ebay, as those played not bad, but esthetics were not the best. The other 200 trumpets are top (both modern and historical).
    I made trumpets for France, Sweden, Germany, Italy, USA, and Spain. Some of them, celebration horns, such as the trumpet made for the 4th Centennial of Jamestown city, in Virginia, USA, as well as for some top professionals.
    Of course I'm very proud of my work. But yesterday I felt a bit "abandoned", just it.
    Anyway, I repeat: I think I'm always honest, and a good guy. In the next update of my web, my Trumpet Making Ebook will be available for free download, in English and Spanish.
    Education, knowledge should be available for all. That will be my small aportation.
    Thanks.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    BOL,
    I am convinced that you do a fine job.
    In english, we make a distinction between studying with and simply attending courses.
    Studying with implies a passing of the tricks of the trade and a fairly large transfer of knowhow. In the trumpet building world, we call this "apprenticeship".

    Attending courses that are designed as introductions, make no claims to absolute historical correctness and have no grading system other than a finished trumpet are more like "casual" or "free-time" events.

    If Michael Münkwitz has the time, he could offer a real apprenticeship. This lasts for a couple of not so well paid years. Then your understanding would apply

    I don't think that you were denied. Barclay & Co. just have a different understanding of the english language.
     
  5. bob barclay

    bob barclay New Friend

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    Nov 6, 2009
    Reply from Bob Barclay
    Gentlemen,
    Yes, this really is just a language issue. Making a trumpet in one of our workshops - which over 400 people have now done since 1994 - is an excellent starting experience, but it is a casual acquaintance with the craft. It cannot be described as training, which is a much more intense, one-on-one experience. As I said to Francisco in my private e-mail, he can of course refer to having participated in out trumpet-making workshop - no problem at all. It is always a pleasure to hear from past students.
    Regarding sandpaper: in earlier times the makers would have used pumice, brick dust, or some other abrasive material. However, sandpaper is much more convenient, and we do deviate somewhat from historical practice. After all, I am sure Herr Hainlein would have really enjoyed using a propane soldering torch!
    Sometimes, when the tailpipe of the bell is worked too much it can expand, causing a loose fit. This is accommodated by shrinking it down. I apologize to Francisco if I forgot to follow up on that.
    With best wishes to all.
    Bob Barclay
     
  6. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    Mr. Perez,
    From reading about your successes in building and selling custom trumpets, as well as your other credentials (degree in Physics, working for Stomvi, etc) it does not sound to me like the difference in wording, related to your time with Barclay, between "Trained with" and "attended workshops" is going to make a great deal of difference in how customers will perceive you or your trumpets. It sounds like your Celebration Models are well received.

    I went to your website and looked around a bit but I was unable to see any photographs of your trumpets. I think that some good images of some very classy trumpet designs would do much more to attract customers than simply adding more words about how you learned to make custom instruments.

    Just one opinion from someone who helps companies with marketing and web design.
     

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