Trumpet Masters only?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by allan birmantas, Sep 1, 2013.

  1. bamajazzlady

    bamajazzlady Mezzo Forte User

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    To master any instrument takes a lifetime of commitment.
     
  2. allan birmantas

    allan birmantas Pianissimo User

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    kewanee.il
    Bingo !
     
  3. rockwell

    rockwell Pianissimo User

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    I think you've met them - simply by posting. Welcome.
     
  4. allan birmantas

    allan birmantas Pianissimo User

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    Yes I have. Thank you.
     
  5. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Back at the family farm I came across my notes from Digicon 85, an International Arts Conference on Computers and Creativity held in Vancouver, BC in 1985. I paid more attention to the fantasy of seducing one of the cuter volunteers than to the symposium on Acceleration of the Artist’s Learning Curve. I took scanty notes.

    Chaired by Tom Hudson, the panel included Bill Buxton (the only musician on the panel, as President for the Computer Music Association), David Em, pioneer computer graphic artist, and Robin King, Director of the Computer Graphics Lab, Sheridan College, Ontario. The presentation of Robin King stuck pretty much intact in my memory (despite the cute volunteer), but it was good to find the notes again.

    He based his presentation on the work of psychologist George Kelly, who had proposed the idea of a hierarchy of mental constructs used as templates by, well, everybody.

    He spoke of the progression of an artist through four stages (and hinted at a fifth), and I wrote that stuff down, and Robin King was kind enough to use two scholarly terms for each of the stages, and then to translate them into language this distracted Vulgani could understand (thinking as I was about another VB [Volunteer Babe]).

    The first stage is that of Technique and Methodology or Classes, that period where we are, well, first obsessive and compulsive about practicing and equipment and listening to recordings and getting immersed into our art.

    The second stage is that of Characteristics of Artist/Habitat or Relations. This is where we are actually living our dream, getting paid for our art and grateful for affording cheap beer with our artist friends.

    The third stage is Status/Professionalism or Systems. This is the point when we can start complaining, and really scrambling. We might ask ourselves questions like: “Why did they get that gig, how can I turn this into some money, how can I better promote myself, how do they afford those cars, that house?” It looks negative in print, but this is the condition real working artists live in. Symphony Societies and recording producers hate working with people in this class--they start demanding fair wages and working conditions, want medical and dental coverage, a pension; they want normal lives!

    The fourth stage is Moral Values (honesty and integrity) or Implications. This is the point that the artist becomes a philosopher.

    The fifth, implied stage is Transformation.

    The free and easy exchange of information we have in such forums as TM was a vision then, it involved a bunch of folk traveling to Vancouver and chatting, but a reality now in our own homes. Wow--being able to exchange ideas almost in real time was the promise of a fax machine back then!

    King spoke of inflection points in the learning curve where the slope could be induced to rise more quickly, rather than continue its normal, slower course. I think TM and its memers provide such inflection points in a whole lot of people’s learning curves.

    For me, being a master is not a static thing. It’s all about growth, and having fun while doing it. In that sense, all of us, are masters, yeah, some are more advanced than others, some are wacky and flat out wrong, but we all have mastered something about the trumpet.
     
  6. allan birmantas

    allan birmantas Pianissimo User

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    Man.....that some deep, ummmmm.....stuff. I read all of it too.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Yeah, Kudos form me also VB ---- you kind of blew my mind with the recollection of these other trumpet masters from the past ---- but since there was no mention of esoteric "magic bubbles", and VB's "Ray of Power" and such --- I had to recheck and re-read to the post, just to make sure it was YOU!!!!

    so -- your at the 4th stage (Philosopher) transforming into the 5th stage ---- AWESOME!!! have a great day!!!
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    actually, I have encephalographic documentation that I also have a 4th characteristic not often found in the fore-mentioned quoted response, as I have cerebral functions also -- so while GM, ole buddy, ole pale, you are happy with your "temperature, respirations, and a pulse" --- I am THINKING about how sad it is you only have 3 out of 4 things needed!!! ROFL ROFL ROFL
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I'm positive I can't type. I just look at the keys and peck.
     
  10. Branson

    Branson Piano User

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    Only lead trumpet players are legends in their own mind.
     

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