Trumpet method help!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by MatanLevy, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. MatanLevy

    MatanLevy New Friend

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    Hi.
    I would like some advice and tips for improving technique and method. I have an arban book but uts very overwhelming and i dont know where to start. I am an intermediate jazz player two years now and i have been told many times that i am a great improviser, yet i dont feel like im always improvising, and that i am repeating phrases i have created througout time. So if anyone had tips for improving method and imrpovisation through arban books and transcribing please do. I need a routine i really dont know where to start. Also im not sure how to use the arban book. Should i transcribe an excersice in all twelve keys? Am i allowed to write in 12 keys or should i hve to transcribe in my head.

    thanks
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I did not know Arban was a book for improvisation. I do believe you can use some passages from Arban to integrate into improvisation (I heard Chris Botti mention this as much during an interview) but direct instruction on improvisation, I would not recommend Arban as a resource.
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    At the time Arban wrote this method, jazz was not yet in its infancy and improvisation was virtually unknown except on piano and organ. So - not the best way of learning improvisation there. And, of course, you must not stick too closely to Arban either. Many of his exercises are extremely valuable; but others can get tedious and are of limited value at best. There's a host of jazz methods out there and many youtube videos on how to do what. Get yourself an overview of what's out there, and then select what works best for you.
    It would be best if you did that with a good teacher (either face to face or via skype or similar channels).
     
  4. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Welcome to TM, MatanLevy. If your interest is improving trumpet playing technique and method, Arban's is a great resource. Eric Bolvin's guide referenced above could help with your your uncertainty as you use Arban's. If your interest is primarily improving your grasp of jazz, there may be other resources more useful. Several TH members recommend Jamey Abersold's study materials: Jamey Aebersold Jazz.

    Jim
     
  5. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Great advice already given, which I will echo here.

    If you want to work out of Arban, and are not sure how to approach it, the study guide by Eric Bolvin is a good way to go.

    Arban will help you with traditional trumpet skills like tonguing, slurring, intervals, scales, ornamentation, phrasing, and characteristic studies.

    To learn to improvise, you need to work on jazz scales, jazz patterns, jazz phrasing, and the jazz repertoire. These jazz resources are not found in Arban. For me, I used Jamey Aebersold to get started, especially Volumes 1, 2, and 3. But there are other good resources out there.

    Mike
     
  6. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Matan,
    You stated:
    "Hi.
    I would like some advice and tips for improving technique and method. I have an Arban book but its very overwhelming and i dont know where to start.
    -----------------
    The Arban's is not the type of book where one starts at the beginning and works their way to the last page.
    Arban's is separated into sections devoted to (for example):
    1.Slurring & Legato
    2.Scales (major, minor, chromatic)
    3.Tonguing (single, double, and triple)
    4.Phrasing
    It's a good idea to spend a little time on all those sections when you practice even if it's just a little time.

    ----------
    I am an intermediate jazz player two years now and i have been told many times that i am a great improviser, yet i dont feel like im always improvising, and that i am repeating phrases i have created througout time. So if anyone had tips for improving method and imrpovisation through arban books and transcribing please do.
    ----------
    With the exception of the musical pieces, The Arban's is more like a workout at the gym. I don't think Arban is the best route for learning improv but it is good for becoming a good trumpet player. Also, There's a document called The Basics Sheet that can be of help. Just type in the words "The Basics Sheet" in the advanced search, and you can print a copy for free.. As for improv and how to do it, Listen "A LOT" to improvisations from every genre of music, Gabriella Montero, Clark Terry, John Mclaughlin, Joe Satriani, Johnny Costa, Toots Theileman, Tommy Emmanuel, maynard, Phil Woods, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Ron McCroby, Doc, Diz, Wynton, and the list goes on. Ask yourself "How do they do that?" Also, there are basic rules (which are loose but still a good idea to know) these can be found in the text The spit book which is an interactive book that is to be used in especially with play alongs such as Aebersold's Nothin but the Blues or Maiden Voyage to name a few. The spit book will help you learn all the important chords and scales necessary for navigating through a piece.
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    Should i transcribe an excersice in all twelve keys? Am i allowed to write in 12 keys or should i have to transcribe in my head.
    ----
    If you do improvisation, you'll need to be able to play off the page in any key. The spit book will help you learn the the different keys and finger patterns.
    Hope this helps
    Dr.Mark
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi Barliman,
    You stated:
    "At the time Arban wrote this method, jazz was not in it's infancy and improvisation was virtually unknown except for piano and organ."
    ---------
    No, that's incorrect. Improvisation stretches way back. In fact, one of the greatest improvisors of all time was Beethoven. Can you imagine getting into a cutting contest with Beethoven!?! That would be like trying to debate with Billy Graham.
    Arban did his text in 1894. The following was gathered from a quick look at Buddy Bolden:
    Many early jazz musicians credited Bolden and the members of his band with being the originators of what came to be known as "jazz", though the term was not in common musical use until after the era of Bolden's prominence. Only one photo exists of Bolden which is from around 1906. At least one writer has labeled him the father of jazz.[3] He is credited with creating a looser, more improvised version of ragtime and adding blues to it; Bolden's band was said to be the first to have brass instruments play the blues. He was also said to have taken ideas from gospel music heard in uptown African-American Baptist churches.

    Instead of imitating other cornetists, Bolden played music he heard "by ear" and adapted it to his horn. In doing so, he created an exciting and novel fusion of ragtime, black sacred music, marching-band music, and rural blues. He rearranged the typical New Orleans dance band of the time to better accommodate the blues; string instruments became the rhythm section, and the front-line instruments were clarinets, trombones, and Bolden's cornet. Bolden was known for his powerful, loud, "wide open" playing style.[1] Joe "King" Oliver, Freddie Keppard, Bunk Johnson, and other early New Orleans jazz musicians were directly inspired by his playing.

    No known recordings of Bolden have survived. His trombonist Willy Cornish asserted that Bolden's band had made at least one phonograph cylinder in the late 1890s. Three other old-time New Orleans musicians, George Baquet, Alphonse Picou and Bob Lyons also remembered a recording session ("Turkey in the Straw", according to Baquet) in the early 1900s. The researcher Tim Brooks believes that these cylinders, if they existed, may have been privately recorded for local music dealers and were never distributed in bulk.
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The Arban Book is a great way to build technique, and although some may claim differently, all trumpeters should first and foremost learn to play the trumpet well. Classical and Jazz are not two separate and distinct styles, but rather different ends of the same spectrum.

    For building a working vocabulary of jazz licks, here is a great resource: Jason Klobnak Music | Info on JKM, JKQ, Books and Improv Tips Look for the lick of the day.
    Have fun!
     
  9. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    HI VB,
    Happy New Year!!
    You stated:
    "Classical and Jazz are not two separate and distinct styles, but rather different ends of the same spectrum."
    ----
    Very, very good point. Louis said it best when he said: "There's only two types of music, good and bad."
    For me, classical studies makes my jazz better. I use a series of books called Scribner's Music library which is a series of piano books that I got for free when someone was cleaning out their basement. By the way, they are a great series of books to play from and can be had cheap.
    Dr.mark
     

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