Trumpet Mold?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by TrumpetChica, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I did quote you first and your quote started with the comment that isopropyl alcohol should not be used in washing the mouth. This is an important concept to understand and your post was valuable in making sure we are aware of this.

    Thank you so much for making that post. I hope this will make it clear for others on how to use isopropyl alcohol.
     
  2. jbkirby

    jbkirby Forte User

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    With all of this discussion, I tried the alcohol rinse and it required very little actual liquid to coat the entire inside of my trumpet. Besides, a bottle of alcohol is a very small price to pay for health preservation. Since alcohol emulsifies with water, it also acts as a drying agent for the freshly-cleaned horn just as alcohol ear-drying agents do in preventing otitis externa.
     
  3. TrumpetChica

    TrumpetChica New Friend

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    Thanks 4 all the advice guys. I shall be sure to pick up some alcohol next time I'm out :)
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    As an aside (hijacking :lol:), alcohol is great at cleaning sticky old valves. They are clean enough to eat off of (since the mold and crud are dead).
     
  5. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    Oh, never mind.
     
  6. Mr.Music14

    Mr.Music14 New Friend

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    To clean it out with out sometimes harful chemicals

    You can take all the valves and slides off and place it in warm water in the bath-tub clean the slides out with a snake and tkae the trumpet out let dry (and make sure it is dry!) then take your snake and clean the trumpets main body.

    Just make sure it is dry and try not to use chemicals because remeber you are putting your mouth on it.:play:
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Remember, this post is about cleaning mold. What you suggest will clean the horn of gunk; it will not control the mold.
     
  8. Mr.Music14

    Mr.Music14 New Friend

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    I sure that doing this would help with the "gunk" and without the "gunk" the mold wouldn't grow as much either

    It is also good for the horn
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    To TM readers that have read my input on this, please bear with me.

    Relating to your comment: "I sure that doing this would help with the "gunk" and without the "gunk" the mold wouldn't grow as much either" You would by wrong with this assumption.

    In the September 2010 American Thoracic Society (Peer Review) Publication Chest, they reported an N-of-1 study (the highest quality evidence-based study that can be done - better than systematic reviews, better than meta-analysis), that IF a brass instrument IS NOT cleaned once a month with 91% isopropyl alcohol, mold will persist, and those individuals sensitive to the mold (called hypersensitivity pneunmonitis), will have a chronic cough.

    As a physician, I absolutely must communicate the importance of this finding, and that if any other TM reader out there has experienced a chronic cough that remains despite being diagnosed as asthma, COPD, etc, it is more than likely hypersensitivity pneunmonitis caused by the mold growing in your horn. There are 2 choices: 1) Stop playing your horn and the conditions will go away in 2-6 months; 2) Keep playing your horn rinsing it monthly with 91% isopropyl alcohol and again, you will be cough free in 2-6 months.

    Relating to your other comment: "It [cleaning] is also good for the horn" - I agree!
     

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