Trumpet: most difficult wind instrument to master?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Haste2, May 9, 2011.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not really, Professor Brookshire (my quintet leader) is constantly busting my chops and blowing the self esteem right out of my sails. At this point in my career, I probably need this. Until I get the self esteem ship sailing again, only then will I even begin to have the remote chance at best to catch you. Until then, I will enjoy ridding in your wake.
     
  2. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I know it's not the right thread.. but what is it with band directors.. group leaders busting chops ... when the band director at the JC I was attending went on subadical they brought in a real jerk (actually you know the word I want to say) ... he be littled players was arrogant... the Dean's office always had someone in there complaining about him... It's one thing t challenge it's anoter thing to be little.. sorrty that hit a nerve with me ..
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Your commentary is not really out of context with the thread actually. Trumpet: most difficult wind instrument to master. The discussion has been centering around the blowing ability. But we also have only 3 valves to work with. No string progression or a keyboard to map out scales for us. Add to this the energy needed to produce sound, and now you have an amazing piece of work to master.

    My chops are being busted by the good professor, not because of my playing ability, but because the good professor wants to instill a sense of theory into my developing sound. So I have to convert the graphical image of the keyboard into a 3 valve instrument... and people think improvisation is difficult! So my current learning curve is a humbling experience, and Professor Brookshire is going to make me a fabulous trumpet player someday. See, I thought I was almost there, and that self esteem has been humbled a bit by a 5 string bass player's knowledge of rhythm, chord progression, and lyrical expression. He has challenged my 3 valve self esteem image, and now I realize, I have to progress with an added dimension. Eddie Brookshire is very professional in his scolding, and it also helps that I am a bit of a masochist.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    And you can't see what you're doing with the trumpet. Even if you look in a mirror, you can't see what's going on in that all important place, the embouchure. Looking at the buttons doesn't help. Where are the visual references? And MOST of the sound is projected forward and clearly intended for somebody other than you (the player).:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
  5. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    It is my understanding that the trumpet has not yet been developed that in itself is accurate in tonation. Thus, we must master the manipulation of it. Too, the sound will vary from one trumpet to another, then we add the factors of sound change with different bores and mouthpiece combinations. Externally, when recording there is much more variance. How can we become objective when even our hearing varies from one to another? I dare say not many humans can discern which is a true A = 440 Hz when they listen to 437 Hz or 443 Hz also. Mix the sequence of these 10 times for evaluation of consistency.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    actually I have a story about a football coach (maybe it was Vince Lombardi -- but I forget who). For this One player - the coach was always yelling at - to "do better", to "run faster" , to "think more"--- the player was frustrated one day and confronted the coach. "why are you constantly on my case coach? - you always on my case" --- The coach calmly responded - "son, you have a lot of potential as a football player, and as a decent young man that can serve society --- I want you to do better, that is why I yell at you -- I want you to give it everything you have --- Son, when I am not on your case to improve, that is when you need to worry - because that is when I have lost any hope that you can improve!!!"
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yes, this is exactly the situation that I am experiencing, and it is making me a better trumpet player.
     
  8. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    my day gig is managing a warehouse... well it's really a night gig ..
    I have been through alot of management classes .. they tell us don't just say "be careful" or "think" .. as a trainer it is our job to point out the things to be mindful .. specifically. I am sure your instructor is really good... was just something that people assume when they say things like "run faster ".. well how do they run faster... are they not lift they knees up high enough... you get my drift...
    glad you are motivated .... that makes school worth it.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    School! After receiving a Bachelors, Masters, PhD and MD, that last degree received over 24 years ago, no more school for me! Professor Brookshire (University of Dayton Jazz Faculty) is teaching me out of the school of “Hard Knocks” - He is the leader of my jazz quintet. He does tell me EXACTLY what I need to do to progress (how high to raise my knees, how wide to space my gate to run faster - using that analogy. He is a great professor, better then most of my medical school professors.
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    And you probably have more fun!:D
     

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