Trumpet mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by amp0709, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    amp0709 I came to this forum with a very similar post and received the same advice, but seemingly more brutal from more members. Rowuk is 100% right. Just like I found out the problem ain't the MP. Have you consulted your teacher?
     
  2. treble_forte

    treble_forte Pianissimo User

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    I couldn't agree with rowuk more.

    In school I had the same experience. Long story short: I wasted a LOT of time and money. I wish I had a teacher like Robin back then. Honestly what he is telling you is gold. Pay heed. If your teacher isn't addressing your playing technique, air and sound its time to change. But not the mouthpiece.

    Mike
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Someone here on the forum has this in the signature: "The difference between a beginner and a pro mouthpiece is practice." Every word worth its weight in gold.

    I have been through the same kind of journey. After a year or so of playing, I felt the need for a bigger mouthpiece and a deeper cup. So I went from 7C to 3C to 1 1/2 B and then was stuck. I had a feeling that the mouthpiece size I wanted was not on the market. So I went to Hermann Ganter and told him my story. He said: "I'll make you a mouthpiece like a shot; but it won't be your last one, and I would advise waiting and practicing a bit..." I was adamant, so he combined the cup of a Denis Wick #4 cornet mouthpiece with a Klier backbore and a Bach 1 1/2 rim. The result? The biggest trumpet saucepan in history. Eliminated the need for a flugelhorn immediately. I did play for a long time on this mouthpiece... until I fell in with Wynton Marsalis (yes, fell in - he stumbled over my trumpet case at breakfast in a Leipzig hotel). We had a five-hour playing session in the morning, and another one after lunch (his evening gig had been cancelled because the venue had been closed due to bankruptcy proceedings), and had a lot of fun together. He put my embouchure to rights, and I've never looked back since. True, I'm still playing a 1 1/2 rim size; but normal cups, and do even use smaller stuff for higher trumpets and picc (Stork Vacchiano 4E).
     
  4. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

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    Different lip anatomies imply that different mouthpieces will feel more comfortable. I disagree with rowuk on this one. The embouchure adjustment could very well lead to you preferring a different size. I would guess that if you're keeping your jaw forward, you would prefer a deeper cup with the same rim size. That means a 1.5B may be worth trying.
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    This is something that needs to be posted in bold lettering in every HS band room on the globe IMO. I don't know where the foolish notion came from that as a player progressed that they "needed" to move to a bigger mouthpiece, but that certainly seems to be a commonly held belief that has persisted for decades. That's how it was when I was in HS. I was playing quite well on a 7C but made a switch because I thought that's what I was supposed to do, and in the process, screwed myself up for several months, all of which could have been avoided if I had just stuck with what worked.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I am not sure age is a factor, as I am 60 and find the 10 1/2 C Bach equivalent sizes still work good for me after over 50 years of playing.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    So true. I mentioned above that a 10 1/2 C Bach equivalent works well for me (as in my Jettone, Kanstul G2, and Olds 3). But I also love and can maintain identical control on my Flip Oakes Wildthing 3C. Why I interchange is partially due to the response the back bore gets out of particular horn. As for the cup end, its the texture I can get out of the delivery of air. It's kinda like deciding to use a large brush versus a narrow brush in bringing out the depth of the scene on the painters canvas.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It's not the anatomy but the physiology. The fine muscles of the lip (physiology) are very adaptable to work over the scaffolding (anatomy) the good Lord provided. With practice and time the physiology will win over the anatomy, every time.
     
  9. Msen

    Msen Piano User

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    Maybe you want to rephrase that part of 1 1/2C feeling small :D :D :D :D

    Why go bigger than that?!?!?! 1 1/2C is already VERY big. I thing after that you'll be looking for a mouthpiece that can help you with endurance and range.
     
  10. limepickle

    limepickle Piano User

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    You are right. I should have used the word "physiology" instead of "anatomy." What you say is true, but there is something to be said about having more comfort on your mouthpiece. A good player can manage to sound good on a standard mouthpiece, but if it is slightly uncomfortable, it is worth trying a change. The OP clearly explained that he changed his embouchure setting to move his lower jaw forward. It may very well be that this causes his original mpc to feel shallow and that he may prefer something deeper. Notice that the OP is not suggesting that he has outgrown the smaller mpc as he has improved his playing, which would obviously be wrong. Bunny Berigan marked his mouthpiece so that he would have the exact same position every time he played. In reality, a good player should do reasonably well despite tiny changes in the setting, but it's just a matter of comfort. And although your physiology can adjust to play different mouthpieces, you will never change it a basic level. Most people simply can't play a bent dime like Cat Anderson used to, even if they have perfect fundamentals. If we can recognize the extreme cases, we should also recognize subtle changes in comfort level for not so extreme cases.
     

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