Trumpet Playing and Lucozade!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by NYCO10, Mar 13, 2010.

  1. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2010
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    Hi every one, today is another busy day of trumpet playing, band from 9.30- 12, symphony concert rehersal 2-5 and the concert at 7, anyway, i usually drink water during rehersals and have never thought about it affecting my trumpet playing (apart from obviously keeping me hydrated) and then today i had a thought, 'if athletes use lucozade for there muscles, why shouldnt trumpet players use it for theirs?!' i have really noticed a difference in my playing already! i no longer feel tired at all and if i start to feel it, i have a sip of lucozade! then im refreshed and ready to go again! does anyone know why this is? some thing to do with the glucose repairing the muscle?! any way it seems to be working for me!

    Peace NYCO10
     
  2. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Ithaca NY
    It should provide the benefits just like it does for any other athletic activity. But the downside is you will be blowing sugary liquid into your horn, unless you rinse with water after. If you clean your horn a lot it won't make much difference, but if not the valves will get gummy and stick.

    v
     
  3. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Trumpet playing is more than just another sport. The results on your nerves may get unpredictable (too much adrenalin) which may affect your performance.
     
  4. NYCO10

    NYCO10 Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2010
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    i wouldnt use it all the time, just on long days and maybe before a concert.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Muscle behavior is different for the fine face muscles and the leg or arm muscles. Check this out:

    Muscle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Our face muscles get tired because of strain, not lack of fuel.
     

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