Trumpet Profiles.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Conn-solation, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I know for me it takes those 20 minutes just for the drugs to kick in...
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Gmonady, The secret is now out as to how you play. Might help me when I listen to your playing also.

    Seriously, alternating 20 minutes playing ("lip time" as I call it) with 20 minutes rest works very well with the beginners I'm tutoring, which during their rest we discuss and I demonstrate. Personally, I had been on such myself, but now I'm 30 min with 15 minutes rest in my own practice.
     
  3. Doug1951

    Doug1951 New Friend

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    I think you are 100% on target kehaulani....."Useless is in the eye of the beholder".....One man's trash can be another man's treasure.......To each his own.......Tunnel vision only works well in a tunnel..........
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The 20 minute thing does not match my experience. When I am on a roll, HOURS go by where I don't want to do anything else. The elation of being "in the groove" can feed me for days.

    I think that perhaps this is comparing apples and oranges. A practice session is not there to learn 10-20-30 minutes worth of new stuff. It is to integrate 5 minutes worth of stuff into our lives. I am convinced that learning music is NOT primarily an intellectual process. Then all of those double high Cs could be "learned"!

    A practice session cannot be compared to a math class or sports training. It is more like a fine meal - Appetizer, soup, main course, dessert! The meal feeds the tongue and nose in many creative ways. It creates a memory to reference other meals by and inspiration for what could come next. We need time to savour each course - even if what we eat is not new, the context, the experience is.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  5. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    I have heard that spending more than 10-15 minutes on one skill ( ie double tonguing,lips slurs) is not the most efficient way to learn. So perhaps the 14 lessons broken up sort of accomplish that ... with fresh chops.
    I know when I was a kid (high school) getting lessons 5 hours sounds about right.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I'll have what he's having!


    Katz's Delicatessen - in "When Harry Met Sally" - YouTube

    Now THAT's profiling!
     
  7. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    The book you are referring to is "Trumpet Profiles" by Louis Davidson. He sent out request for info to all the players and the comments are what they sent back. I've had a copy since the 70's It's a fun read to see all the different approaches. But I like stuff like that. can you learn anything to help your own practicing? not really.
     
  8. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    "Practice" is just a word for the professional player :cool: For me, whenever I pick up my horn, I just go right into playing. :roll:
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Assuming one can comprehend what they read, I cannot lay aside that some learning from a book is without application to practice ability at some usually lower levels than professional. If this were not so, I want to know which professional has not used Arban's, Clarke's or other text at some stage in their pursuit of accompliishment. If you limit such comment to Davidson's book, I concur that it hasn't much to apply to practice, at least from what I now remember of it.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Professionals "rehearse" when they are not performing.
    Students "practice" when they are not performing.
    Others "play" and enjoy when they are not performing.

    While I favor the latter, I've a regular regimen of "lip time" which some may call "practice" or "rehearsing". It's just semantics.
     

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