Trumpet Recording Help

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tempest, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    I need to record some stuff for a demo CD and I can't seem to get a recording with good sound. I borrowed an Apex 435 mic from a friend and am trying to record on that.

    How far away should the mic be/what kind of room should I be in?

    Is this an ok mic to record with?

    What program should I be using to record?

    thanks in advance for any help
     
  2. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    anyone?
     
  3. govtmodel

    govtmodel Pianissimo User

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    Audacity is a good, free program. What kind of room are you using?
     
  4. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    I've tried a small bedroom, my fairly open living room, and a practice room.

    I tried all three of these using audacity and the sound recorded was pretty bad. The recording has a very closed, unopen sound that really I don't know how else to describe, it was just bad.
     
  5. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    You could add a little bit of reverb to your recording to give it more presence.


    If I were auditioning someone, I would want to hear them playing well in the worst room. If you can sound good in a bad room, then you are doing ok.
     
  6. govtmodel

    govtmodel Pianissimo User

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    Try a church. There is usually a natural reverb. Experiment with mic location.
     
  7. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    I tried adding some reverb and it did seem to help a bit but I still feel like I shouldn't be making such a sacrifice with a mic like this
     
  8. gchun

    gchun Piano User

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    My suggestion would be to use the room you sound best in. Then experiment with mic position. Try a higher mic position to get more room sound. Try getting the mic a bit off axis rather than blowing straight into the mic. On-axis will sound clean, but possibly too harsh. Too high a position will give you too much room sound and not enough clarity and definition. I would start with the mic about 10-15 feet away from the bell, and a few feet higher than the bell. Record, listen, adjust. Adjust the mic, not the way you play.

    One thing you can try: Find someone whose ears you trust. Have THEM walk around the room while you play until they find the spot that sounds best. Put the mic there as a starting point.

    Record about 30 seconds and move yourself/your mic around the room.

    You have to experiment to find out works best with your sound, your room and your recording equipment.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2010
  9. govtmodel

    govtmodel Pianissimo User

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    Can you clarify what this means?
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    That's not a great mic for recording trumpet IMO. It's a large diaphragm condenser studio mic, best suited to vocals. You are probably getting a lot of clipping, right? (Distorted, overdriven sound)

    What are you using for your digital audio workstation?

    I mean, we're talking a $60 LD condenser mic, which for that kind of mic isn't a lot. By comparison, some LD studio condensers run into the thousands.

    Are you using phantom power? Do you have that capability?

    So many questions. Let's break this down a little bit:

    1.) What preamp are you using?
    2.) Are you using a mixer?
    3.) Does your preamp/mixer have 48v phantom power capability?
    4.) Are you recording digitally, or are you using something else?
    5.) How much gain are you using?
    6.) Are you using any compression or any other kind of plug-in or tool to limit the signal?

    I have a LD condenser studio mic, but I don't use it for my horn. While maybe not the ideal microphone for horn, I use a Shure SM57 dynamic mic, but even there, you don't have to spend that much money. How much time do you have? If you have a little time, you could order a Behringer XM8500 dynamic mic. Reviews say it's like a Shure SM58 vocal mic, but a bit more live, but on top of that, it's only a touch over $20 where the SM58 runs about $100. Heck, for that matter, you could probably do a little scrounging and come up with an SM57 or 58 - schools, churches...pretty much anyone with any kind of PA setup.

    For what you are trying to do (In my opinion, of course) a regular dynamic mic would be a much better choice than that LD condenser.

    Send us an update and maybe the folks on the board can get you going with what you need to get your demo recorded.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2010

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