Trumpet Recording Help

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Tempest, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. Irensaga

    Irensaga Pianissimo User

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    Feb 3, 2010
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    I second the SM57 I use it for live and tunes I record at home. In studio I have used the 57 close up to the bell and a condenser placed about 3 meters away and mixed the two sounds until I liked the result.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Baltimore/DC
    The first recordings I made I did with the Logitec USB microphone that came with my kids' Guitar Hero: World Tour. Not really a great sound, but not terrible either.

    I've never recorded using 2 mics at once - I suppose I could, but so far I've been happy enough with what I get from the SM57. There are better mics for recording trumpet, but I think that the SM57s and 58s are about the best bang-for-the-buck mics on the market. Consider that Madonna did a lot of her early vocals with an SM57, and Bono used an SM58. (Sometimes a Beta 58) While I realize that we're talking about trumpet, not vocals, the 57 has proven over and over again that it can (and is) used for just about everything, both on the stage and in the studio.
     
  3. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Ok lets see, keep in mind im new to this stuff so I don't know what half this stuff means or does....

    1.)nady phantom power supply with usb out
    2.) I don't believe so....
    3.)yes it has a 48v setting
    4.) I was just using audacity with the mic hooked up to the comp through usb
    5.)not sure what this does but, gain was set to 0 on audacity
    6.)Not that I know of....
     
  4. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009

    I just called a friend and he has a Shure SM58 I could borrow as well, maybe this would solve some of the issues???
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think that it will help a lot. In my limited experience, I find condenser mics a little more finicky to use, especially since I don't have a treated room. They pick up a lot of sound, and with a LD condenser, you get a lot of extra noise sometimes that you don't want to hear.

    The SM58 will make it easier to get a track down, and you'll have a little more headroom for adjustment in terms of gain and that kind of thing.

    You might also be able to use some compression of your signal going in using the presets and tools in Audacity - you'll definitely want to use some reverb, although not too much - just to give the sound some depth.

    Are you recording with any other kind of track, or are you just doing just trumpet?
     
  6. beautgrainger147

    beautgrainger147 Pianissimo User

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    Aug 6, 2009
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    I'm not sure this will be of any benefit but I'm considering (trying) recording vocals at home with a mic to a decent guitar amp then either another mic from the amp to the computer or just a cable.. currently disliking the slight dryness when recording to the computer
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Dry is what you get until you apply an effect like reverb. Many applications allow you to add it in at the time of recording or after the fact. I do a lot of recording with plain old Garage Band on an iMac, and there are a number of tweakable presets that can give pretty decent results, especially where reverb is concerned. I recently recorded a U2 song and SOAKED my vocals in reverb because that's kind of what was used on the original recording, and given that I used a Shure SM57 with the add on wind screen/pop filter (thus pretty much making it an SM58, which was what Bono used on the early many of the U2 recordings) getting the right kind of sound wasn't terribly difficult.
     
  8. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    Jan 23, 2004
    Novato, CA, USA
    If you are close micing (mic close to the bell) then you want a dry signal. If you move the mic away, you'll get more room in the signal, and it will be less dry.

    If you have a good sounding room, by all means record it :)

    If you close mic you have more control over the the simulation of a room's ambiance with delays and reverbs. However, it will never sound as good as a great sounding room, imho, but then again, few of us have great sounding rooms.

    FWIW, if you need to use a compressor to tame the signal so that it will not clip, by the time it hits your A/D it's too late. You'll have effectively captured the clipped signal. For compressors to really work their magic on input attenuation, this needs to happen in the analog realm when the harmonic distortion is actually pleasing. Digital distortion rarely is.

    I don't know anything at all about USB mics, but the implication to me is that the A/D occurs on the mic itself. I have no idea where you'd put the compressor in that chain.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    When I was talking about modeled compression, it was more of an effect to keep the highs from getting too high and the lows from getting too low - just to level it a bit. I agree that the gain has to be kept under control before it gets to the DAW, unless the gain is being controlled from the DAW too.

    I have an analog compressor, but in order for it to work like I'd need it to with a condenser mic, I'd have to first put a preamp in front of it with phantom power because it does not supply phantom power, and trying to supply it from my Focusrite preamp wouldn't work.
     
  10. Tempest

    Tempest New Friend

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Have any suggestions as a starting place for the reverb settings? There are alot of things to tweak...
     

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