trumpet stand... the dark side?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JRgroove, Aug 11, 2015.

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  1. JRgroove

    JRgroove Mezzo Piano User

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    I'm wondering about this myself. Is this true? Will the cornet bell warp?
     
  2. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    Stands at home are great if you like to polish silver fyi
     
  3. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    "In the hand, or in the case when at home"

    Stands are for gigs - trumpet on a stand on a table - a No No for me,

    If it was a Tromba Plastic horn, then OK,
     
  4. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    ​Something I never even considered, a very good point too. So , lose those horns and buy a Tromba!
     
  5. redintheface

    redintheface Pianissimo User

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    To "stand", or not to "stand", is that the question?

    I use a stand during practice (I commonly play the trombone as a part of my routine) and swapping instruments is easier if I plonk it down on a stand rather than lay it flat on a table, or put it back in the case. Putting it back in the case is a tricky one. The Bach I play will sit in an open case with mouthpiece fitted, and not touch the sides of the case, BUT ONLY if a Bach mouthpiece is in! I don't use my Bach mouthpieces any more, I use one of my two Kanstuls, and due to the shape, they rest against the side of the case. This worries me - over time, it is quite likely that the strain on the leadpipe might bend it, which is something I am not willing to explore! So it either goes on the stand (if no one else is near) or it's "mouthpiece-out-and-in-the-case". If anyone else is near (there are some minion-y type beings around quite often, not sure where they came from....) the case gets locked.

    As an aside, I switched from the 3-pronged stand to a 5-pronged stand some years ago and never looked back. the 3-pronged stand had a habit of falling over. Thank goodness it only decided to do so when my hands (or legs, or feet, or some other part of my body haha!) were near it. I'm not saying I'm a klutz, but.....

    And finally, the Bach is quite robust, as trumpets go. If I had a copper bell, or rimless, or super-thin (I've heard some Monettes, Getzens, and others are like this), I wouldn't even use a stand, it would be straight back in the case every time. Fear of a crumpled bell is too much for me.

    Nick
     
  6. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    "I" want to know what that Leslie is attached to???????

    I hope it's a tube Hammond, maybe a B or an A.....a D maybe????
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Chuck, you just beet me to the punch. I was wondering which Hammond was attached to that Leslie myself.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    When I get the urge to play the horns with the keyboard, no zipping our unzipping in my home, I just pick one off the wall:
    [​IMG]
     
  9. JRgroove

    JRgroove Mezzo Piano User

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    currently attached to the A-100. There is also an M3 in the room that gets some Leslie time. (Leslie 145)
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    That's my A-100 in the pic above. And I started out playing in the rock band that paid my way through college on the M3 that was owned by the band. A lot easier to cart the M3 than a B3 or A-100 for sure.
     

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