Trumpet vs Cornet During Comeback?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Jace, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,965
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    It makes no difference. Both are easy enough to play. Both require a bit of dedication on behalf of the player, a bit of mechanical maintenance and an environment where we can make some noise without stressing the neighbors or family.
     
  2. PakWaan

    PakWaan Piano User

    367
    103
    Apr 4, 2010
    Orlando, FL
    I've got an Olds Ambassador cornet that is my office horn - it sits on my desk so it's available to play whenever I get the urge during the day without breaking out one of my "good" horns. If it gets knocked off the desk it's not a huge deal.... I use both instruments interchangeably.
     
  3. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,420
    7,547
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I would stop listening to whoever filled your head with that techno-babble gibberish/ pseudo knowledge . If I played my Conn 12A next to my Blessing Super Artist, you probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference. They "feel" the same. Buy the cornet and practice your butt off.:thumbsup:
     
  4. craigph

    craigph Piano User

    472
    20
    Mar 12, 2010
    Japan

    Something just occurred to me - if you buy an Olds Ambassador cheap you should be aware that it won't take a standard cornet mouthpiece shank. You will either have to play whatever mouthpiece came with it or buy something with an Olds shank. For the latter a Curry is probably your best bet (reasonable prices). See here:

    Curry Precision Mouthpieces | Cornet Mouthpieces

    There are other cornet of similar vintage and selling price that accept a normal cornet mouthpiece. Reynold Medalist is one such that is similar in quality and price to the Ambassador. Just thought you should be aware of this difference before buying an Ambassador cornet.
     
  5. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
    81
    1,804
    91
    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.

    On this one I fully agree. I have several of each and love them all.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  6. craigph

    craigph Piano User

    472
    20
    Mar 12, 2010
    Japan

    Sorry about that. I remembered about this after posting. I can never remember what year such things changed so I probably should say "you should be aware that some receivers are non-standard" rather than all. Thanks for pointing that out Lou.
     
  7. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

    6,415
    3,216
    Oct 25, 2005
    Sunny Ca.
    Here is the notice Olds put out in cases and to dealers.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
    81
    1,804
    91
    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.


    In the process of rereading this thread I came to wonder which of your instruments had the "increased back pressure". I checked one of my Olds Ambassador cornets, measuring the I.D. of the second valve crook with a Mitutoyo dial caliper, at .469". If we accept the fallicy that large bore is the sole criteria for free blowing, this one would be a prime example of a big bore horn. This little old Olds is a real good sized horn, BUT, valve alignment, internal cleanliness, poor solder joints that have left globs in various parts of the bore, and several other factors could be the problem with either of your horns. Rest assured, this little Olds that I have currently on my trumpet stand is indeed a free blowing and sweet singing horn. I could ask for little more from its performance.
     

Share This Page