Trumpet vs. Flugel conundrum

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Asher S, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. Asher S

    Asher S Pianissimo User

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    Thanks- I'll try that too.

    Asher
     
  2. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    When was the last time you had a professional compression test on the old's valves and slides. You may have worn valves that will make a horn not slot well.
     
  3. Asher S

    Asher S Pianissimo User

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    Funny you should mention that: I was just playing the 2 horns again, and when I play a chromatic ascending scale with no tonguing, I noticed that the (newer) flugel valves generate a much cleaner transition between notes vs the 50 year old Olds.

    I was wondering if that has something to do with the fact that this Ambassador model has LA valves... perhaps they are not as good a fit as the original Ambassador valves were. This trumpet is a restored model (Gary Schuchman - amazing job...) : Vintage Trumpets Olds Refurbished Trumpets - Home .

    I think your comment is spot on and I will bring the Olds in to Rayburn Music for a valve checkup.

    Thanks.
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Asher,

    Also, with the Olds, you can replace the springs, felts, washers (both felt and thin cork), and guides with a kit. I have a 1964 Ambassador and got my kit off ebay. Nice upgrade for an old instrument, if you haven't done this already. It was $20. With some tech help, this old Ambassador has valves nearly as nice as the Getzen.

    Turtle
     
  5. Asher S

    Asher S Pianissimo User

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    Thanks. I'll take a look for future reference. This Olds was professionally restored within the last couple of years (it looks like new), and as far as I can tell the felts, washers, cork etc are in good shape. The springs on my flugel may actually be a bit too stiff rather than the Olds' springs being too loose.

    I think the different playability between the 2 horns is due to multiple differences & variables rather than a single factor. I've stopped trying to figure it out, and I'm just enjoying playing the flugel.
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Only trumpet players ponder a horn that plays too well! :lol:
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    That's what my instructor keeps telling me: "Stop thinking so much. Do this. Don't do that!"

    Works wonders!:lol:

    Turtle
     
  8. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Asher S -

    I would try playing the flugelhorn exclusively for a few weeks and then see how you feel when you pick up your trumpet. Response issues sometimes are more tied up with moving back and forth between instruments.

    The other big difference is that the valves on your flug are only a few inches away from the mouthpiece, so you will get quicker feedback when playing it than with your trumpet where they are 10 or so inches further away.

    asher h
     

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