Tuner frequency

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by alant, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think that context is important to consider. A440 is pretty much an international standard, but some ensembles tend to play a bit higher than that, and others tend to play a bit lower, so it's a relative thing. A440 has been a standard since something like the 1920s, but other tuning standards are still used - probably not as much as 440 though.
     
  2. catello

    catello Pianissimo User

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    I always have trouble with people who use tuners. Those people are, in my experience, almost always out of tune! Focusing on a device, and not listening to others, does not help. One person should tune to a device and then immediately put it away in their case. Everyone else picks up their note. If there's an un-tunable instrument in the group (piano, for example), then that becomes the tuning note regardless of the frequency of the A.

    You know where your slide should be when you tune properly. If you find you're far off, then you mention the group may be tuning a little sharp/flat, not because some squiggly line on a tuner or your phone may be moving around.

    Just my 2 Hz.
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    There's almost always an untunable instrument in many ensembles - piano, (either electric or acoustic) chimes, xylophone, marimba, etc. Regardless, I've been in so many ensembles where we tune up to a tuner or something similar, and as soon as we take off the pitch shifts - usually sharp.

    And there's nothing like listening to a row of tubas tune up - it sounds like a squadron of B-29 bombers rolling over the top! ROFL

    EDIT - ugh, forgive my error in screwing up "there" and "their" - sorry 'bout that! Fixed!
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  4. catello

    catello Pianissimo User

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    One of my pet peeves - people who start to tune to a tuner immediately after taking out their instrument. You need to play for a while - 15 mins, 30 mins, then tune. And then listen!

    A community band I play with has, on a normal night, 4 or 5 tubas. Talk about noise! And don't get me started on the French Horns - always pulling out their slides to drop spit. It's amazing they even get close to a note.:shock:
     
  5. alant

    alant Pianissimo User

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    hi yes you are correct the cornet is old it is a Getzen Capri about 30 years old, i have bought a Bach 1&1/2C mouthpiece and many notes are sharp while some seem eratic.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I fail to understand your problem. ANY attempt to tune is better than NO ATTEMPT.

    I have never met a person with a tuner that did not appreciate positive reinforcement - that in turn helped them to get even more serious.

    I do not know of one major symphony in the whole world where the oboe does not use a tuner to get the A right.

    One of my pet peeves are the tuning police that think that they have the issue solved. The only solution is enough personality to get those around you cooperative. Peeing on their leg accomplishes just the opposite.

    My tuning slide varies a bit depending on room temperature, altitude (2000 meters above sea level in Saas-Fee is much different than a promenade concert in Monte Carlo) and mouthpiece inserted.

    We change the world one person at a time..................
     
  7. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    I have similar issues with my Willson Shepherds crook, gather that it is a feature of these models. Between having a large change in temperature between cold and warm the notes D-G being sharp, it is difficult to tune. I spent all day working on tone centering just to pick it up first thing in the morning and be dead on(cold). Someone on trumpet herald recommended tuning to B (third space A concert), so as to split the difference between the sharp notes, and the others, and I find that to work, though there were the plethora of people who said such nonsense doesn't matter.
     
  8. catello

    catello Pianissimo User

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    I don't disagree with anything that you have written. In the symphony example you give, the oboe tunes to a tuner, and then everyone else listens and tunes. But by the time the group gets to this, they have usually been individually going through their warmup routines and are ready to actually tune their instrument (or, more accurately, fine-tune).

    My real issue is the folks who keep a tuner, or more commonly now, their iPhones on the stand and checking their tuning to some magical wavy line. Sure, it's better than not tuning at all, but I think it's better to exercise the ear muscles, and pay attention to what's going on with the band around you.

    I do think a tuner is a good individual practice device, though. Tune. Play for a while. Check your note and see if you are changing your pitch.

    But during a gig (or group practice), playing "in tune" is more important than playing A=440.
     
  9. catello

    catello Pianissimo User

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    Hey, I'm Pianissimo now!
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I love the sound and feel of massed tubas ..... just saying :oops:
     

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