tuning issues

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eisprl, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. claminator

    claminator New Friend

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    Jun 18, 2008
    Rowuk,

    Although everything you say is great... I'm all about beauty of sound and great inhales....but

    I think there is more to it than that.

    Unfortunately I can't play my G on the top space the same way in Eflat Maj. as I do in C Maj. Although I agree with you in the idea that center is really important, you have to be able to hear when a little off from center is more "in tune". Thus creating a better resonant chord.. I've heard people play recitals in grad school with really awesome sounds and be flat as hell..maybe the piano was out or maybe his tuning slide was out (although I don't think that was the case since some parts were in tune and others not) The point is that the ultimate way to master this is to hear it extremely clearly. Sound and Intonation... each one on the highest level possible
    We all have models of great sounds, but when it comes to intonation not many people take the time to REALLY slow things down and listen. Spend a week with a piano tuner and see what happens to your ears and your ability to recognize imperfections in intonation.
    ** unfortunately you might go crazy** :)


    Clamnation
     
  2. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Another issue to consider in this discussion is 'partial hearing imparement'. In my case, I have a pronounced hearing loss and a tinitus ringing in my ears at a perfect G. This means that in many cases a very softly played G is undetectable to me. Heck, I just can't hear it.


    On another, and related 'note', I wear hearing aids for most of my day, but, because they amplify everything quite strongly, I can't stand to have them plugged into my ears at any ensemble function. All I can hear while playing with any ensemble is cacophony while my hearing aids are turned on. The hearing aids also bend tones up and down enough that I can't come close to getting into tune while using them. When I go to any ensemble practice or performance, the first thing that I do upon arrival is to remove my hearing aids and put them into their case.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Clam
    my point is that you need to get the instruments on the same page. Most all of the students that I have inherited and many of my colleagues play high on the pitch. Once they learn to get the instrument in basic tune everything becomes less work. The sound opens up and the range and endurance improves. When a group has funky intonation, even the good players pull the tuning slide out a bit and lip up. That has less chance of cracking a note than playing "loosely".

    I did tune pianos and found that work detrimental to my playing. The well tempered scale is fine for a keyboard, but is not in "tune" for a wind player.
    Get the ensemble centered and everyone benefits!
     
  4. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    Hey!! You play the TRUMPET!

    Make everyone else tune to you!

    :lol:
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    they don't - and that is how they get even............... :twisted:
     
  6. claminator

    claminator New Friend

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    Jun 18, 2008
    Rowuk,

    When I said work with tuning pianos, it was for the purpose of generally awakening the ear to be more sensative to slight imperfections. Eventhough the piano is well tempered it doesn't change the fact that you have to ear when the temperment is correct. If most people played their 4ths, 5ths and 8vas as in tune as a piano, we would probably not be having this discussion. My point is that you must hear it.

    When it comes to playing in a group with funky intonation I NEVER pull my slide out as a general rule to lip up and be more accurate. I would miss half of my notes. Push your slide in a dig in with your air. This way you won't be out of balance with the horn. Lipping up will get you tired really quick and probably be detrimental to your sound.

    The Clam Center
     

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