Tuning Question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by habitatchad, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Chad, in the fast passages should you use first valve, and nobody will notice. If slower, the 1-3 d will sound in tune.

    When I was a C trumpet-learning student, I was able to play Barnum and Bailey's Favorite at tempo with a bunch of cross fingerings plus transpositions on my C--it really helped train my third finger!

    My suggestion wuold be to stay with your horn and start doing the 1-3 thing, and with practice it will not be slower. Your body will learn!

    Have fun, and I bet your cornet sounds great!
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If your horn was made for low pitch, A=435-438, the length of the first valve is probably a bit too long. I find it easier to let the pitch fall on a couple of notes rather than lipping it up to the extreme. I would get a GOOD tech to look at it and decide if shortening the first valve slide is the best course. I had it done to my 1911 Holton long cornet. In Germany we tune to A=443 and the cornet just stayed in the case. After shortening, it has a new lease on life!
     
  3. habitatchad

    habitatchad Pianissimo User

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    Aug 18, 2008
    Clinton, TN
    I bet that this is the issue. When the horn is cold, I can't push the slide in far enough to get it in tune. After it warms up I only have to pull the slide out 1/8". I have read that tuning slides on the bell side of the horn/tunable bells take less adjustment distance than the traditional set up. I tried a shallower mouthpiece (still quite deep) and the D was a little closer. I plan on ordering a Shilke 16c4 next week when I get paid to see if that fixes the problem, if not i can use it for my other cornet.

    Thanks,
    Chad
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    That is fine and good, but can you get the horn to play in tune with itself? Is the "d" just bad on the tuner, or can you notice it on whichever pitch you tune to?

    Some horns of that vintage came with two sets of slides for the low and high pitch, it may be you've got the longer slide in the first valve. I think 1-3 for the longer tones is the cheapest and surest option.
     
  5. Brass crusader

    Brass crusader Mezzo Piano User

    For the D-tuning issue... I'd reccomend that you get a tuner, and play with that. Then, with the tuner on, close your eyes and work on lipping the note to where you feel it's best in tune. Open your eyes at that point, and see where you are. Then begin to practice like that, until you can wean yourself away from the tuner and begin to rely on your ear.


    Good luck:-)
     

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