Two Days Left!!!!!! Wcu Trumpetfest!!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by MrWho3421, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. MrWho3421

    MrWho3421 Pianissimo User

    142
    2
    Jun 1, 2006
    Hey everyone,

    There are 2 days left until the West Chester Trumpet Fest. It's going to be one of the best trumpet days ever!!! Hope to see many of you there! Come by my table and say hi!

    Andrew Kissling
    www.AKBrassPress.com
     
  2. NYTC

    NYTC Forte User

    1,137
    4
    Nov 1, 2004
    Brooklyn,NY
    yeap,
    Can't wait.
    We'll come and visit you,Andrew .:)
     
  3. MrWho3421

    MrWho3421 Pianissimo User

    142
    2
    Jun 1, 2006
    Yeah Felix! I want to try your new horns. They look sweet!!!
     
  4. NYTC

    NYTC Forte User

    1,137
    4
    Nov 1, 2004
    Brooklyn,NY
    You will,you will.:)
     
  5. swissdude

    swissdude Pianissimo User

    195
    4
    Nov 29, 2003
    West Chester, PA
    ........2..........1.........and Trumpet Fest :-) This is awsome guys. Everything is ready to go. Setting up tables tomorrow and we'll be good.
     
  6. miles71

    miles71 Mezzo Piano User

    656
    14
    Nov 8, 2004
    Maryland
    Looking forward to tomorrow. Someone had asked earlier about schilkes, Stus will have a nice sprend of b5, s32, s42, and some of the little guys on hand. He is also running the Yamaha Table.


    I look forward to seeing all of you guys again. Maybe we can have a "reading session" in the exhibit room. Just for fun.
     
  7. gtromble

    gtromble Pianissimo User

    226
    1
    Dec 31, 2005
    Man oh Man -- what a great day we had!

    All the clinicians did a great job. Frank Kaderabek, Craig Morris, Jeffrey Curnow -- all gave masterful workshops. Nick Drozdoff kept us wide awake with his science experiments and toys. He plays a mean PVC trumpet with funnel bell, too.

    Mike Vax - coming off an operation and several weeks without playing, did a great clinic and then played his A** off in the evening concert.

    As crazy as it was to start at 8:30 on a Sunday morning -- it proved well worth it.

    Thanks to J.C. and Felix and all the other folks that put this on!

    Galen
     
  8. crash

    crash New Friend

    25
    0
    Dec 6, 2006
    Maryland
    I really got a lot out of Craig Morris' clinic. it was all about separating the conscious and sub-conscious mind when practicing and performing. When I got home last night I was explaining it to my wife and she raised and eyebrow and looked at me like I had been sniffing valve oil again!
    But, it really made a huge amount of sense. If you could shut off the conscious mind while performing you eliminate the internal judgement, fear, negative images, and self praise that go on while your performing. Stuff like "Oh No I missed that A and here comes another one" Or "Wow I nailed the hard part and it's smooth sailing from here" only to flop the easy part.
    As an amature I don't solo very often. I play in front of people every Sunday(except this past Sunday,which I'm feeling a little guilty about but it WAS worth it) playing with the piano and organ. I thought all this playing would help me rid myself of stage fright. But my solo at Christmas was just as scary as the ones I played when I was 12. I am really hoping to use what I learned at this clinic to change the way I practice and hopefully separate the part of my mind that critiques my playing from the part that just plays. You basically shut down your internal critic while Performing(or practicing a piece) then STOP. then replay what you just did and compare it to what you wanted to do and then critique. STOP again and then visualize SuperYou playing the piece the way it should sound and feel. Then play it again. STOP again. If it's good then store it, if it's not then compare and critique again and so on.
    There is no way to get across all that Craig Morris shared with us. It would make for very good reading or if someone taped the clinic it would be worth watching several times.
     
  9. gtromble

    gtromble Pianissimo User

    226
    1
    Dec 31, 2005
    Craig -- I've read some of the books along this line -- Inner Game of Tennis, Effortless Mastery, etc -- I thought Craig Morris' use of the video 'remote' analogy to help you switch mental modes was really great. I'm incorporating it into my practice. For those who weren't there -- the modes are "visualize", "perform," "analyze" and "sandbox". Sandbox is where you go to experiment on things. In between these is a bit STOP button -- which you use frequently. Idea is to deliberately put your mental state in one of the modes. So, for instance -- when you're performing you're not analyzing at the same time. Practicing this, he says, will help you keep these mental states separate so that, for example, you can turn off the analyze mode and be in perform mode at your audition.

    One piece of advice that several clinicians discussed was to SLOW DOWN your practice to a tempo where you can play the passage perfectly. Not new advice -- but how many of us routinely do this?
    GT
     

Share This Page