Two mouthpieces...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Dustin, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. Dustin

    Dustin Pianissimo User

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    I really want to be able to play on the same mouthpiece for everything, but for a while I got used to playing on an all-around mouthpiece and a lead mouthpiece, and now as I'm trying to limit myself to one, my upper register is noticably weaker on my 1 1/2 C. I know lead can be played on a mouthpiece that big, because my friend (an absolutely incredible player) plays lead on a 1 1/4 C. Is my lack of satisfaction in the upper register because bigger, deeper mouthpieces just don't work for me personally for lead, or is that simply because of a weak upper register development on that particular mouthpiece?
     
  2. BflatAnklan

    BflatAnklan Pianissimo User

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    Lead on a 1 1/4C? Wow! There are a LOT of reasons why someone might not be able to play lead on that piece. It would be difficult to advise you on this one without seeing you play in person. There is such a difference in sound for lead playing versus other kinds of trumpet playing, and I can say from my personal experience that haveing two pieces is the way to go.

    Good luck!!
     
  3. Magnusverdixon

    Magnusverdixon Pianissimo User

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    Arturo Sandoval and Charlie Davis both haved played Lead on Bach 3c's ... never heard of anyone actually playing Lead on something larger than that ... many pros use multiple mouthpieces. Soem use the same exact rim on different cups ... some use totally different pieces. My two cents
     
  4. Toptrump04

    Toptrump04 New Friend

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    That is an awefully big moutpiece to be playing lead on. I struggled playing lead on a 3C and can't even imagine playing on anything larger. I think you should try out a different mouthpeice and look into the possibility of using two.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You don't see our men in uniform riding around in Iraq with Ferraris do you? There is a good reason for that!
    The same applies to lead playing. You generally need different equipment for rough terrain (especially when you are being shot at!). A lead sound needs a lot of sizzle - something that would get you thrown out of most legit situations! If your playing is 99% serious lead, you can get away with one mouthpiece (not the 1 1/2C).
    Basically you can play anything on anything - the question is why?
    The basic math on a mouthpiece is that deeper pieces darken the tone by reducing the "lip support" that the air pressure in the cup gives and have more lip mass in the cup. Neither is "optimal" for real lead screaming. Players that make big equipment work are the exception and not the rule. They need to compensate for the normal big, fat tone of big mouthpieces by twisting around other aspects of their playing. Another factor is that when you are younger, you can overcome common sense with power - something that will punish you later in life!
    You'll notice that I haven't mentioned range. IF your breathing/playing technique is good, mouthpiece size will not inhibit your range. If your upper register is weaker with this piece, then you have some work to do.
    Playing lead is more than high notes and sizzle, though. The rest of the section needs to "keep up". A lead player with a large deep piece is not helping here at all.
    My advice: let go of the one size fits all concept. When you play lead - optimize that situation-with the correct sound and concept. When you play other things, optimize them too. The requirements are different and if you want to play EVERYTHING, then you have to practice more to keep that flexibility up!
     
  6. Dustin

    Dustin Pianissimo User

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    The only thing I really have against playing on my lead piece is that I always feel like crap when I switch back to my all around piece, and I don't want that any more. I think using the same rim with different cup depths will probably help me out a lot. I hope so anyways...
     
  7. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Bryon Stripling plays a huge mpc if I remember correctly. It's all about matching your face, teeth, jaw, strength, etc to the correct piece for you.


    I personally play about 3-4 different pieces (same rim now, different depths) for my stuff. I have no issues switching even mid phrase! Yes, I am crazy.

    -T
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Your legit chops will ALWAYS take a beating when playing serious lead. The only cure is continual development of your chops and breathing skills. Wait until you have played a dance gig on the big mouthpiece - THAT can be far worse and more damaging than having done the job efficiently. The same rim may help, if your chops don't fall into the shallow cup and stop producing tone entirely. Mine do, so I only use a smaller mouthpiece.
     
  9. Dustin

    Dustin Pianissimo User

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    Shallow pieces are comfortable, and I can play down to F# and lower, but I just don't like the way they feel sometimes.
     
  10. Dave

    Dave Guest

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2007

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