Two practice sessions per day

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by VetPsychWars, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    I can't practice at home, so I practice in a storage room at work. I have an hour in the morning, and since my playing is not at the level I want it to be, I'm adding another hour after work in the evening.

    How would you split your practice? I'm thinking Cichowicz long tones and lip slurs in the morning, and then technical things like tonguing exercises and etudes in the evening.

    Tom
     
  2. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

    2,513
    1,291
    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    Six mini sessions might be better!

    Maybe there 15 min sessions with 5 mins in between.. That would be 55 mins.
    #1- Long Tones, Lip Bends, VC Flow Studies
    #2- Flexibilities & Lip Slurs
    #3- Scales & Clarke
    Then in the evening:
    #4a- 10 mins summary of all the stuff you did in the morning to get the buzz going
    5 min break
    #4b- Arban stuff (Articulation, Intervals, Characteristics)
    5 min break
    #5- Lyrical stuff (Arban Art of Phrasing, Concone, ballady jazz tunes, Charlier #2, etc.. )
    Break
    #6- Wildcard... whatever you want to develop. Literature, Etudes, Concertos, Solo Rep, Improvisation, etc...

    Plan out your week... so you can cover everything.
    Monday you do everything in F#, change keys every day.
    Maybe you do Major Scales on Monday, then Dorian on Tuesday, Minor on Friday... mix it up. Don't ignore the weird ones (Whole Tone, Diminished (W-H & H-W), Pentatonic, Harmonic Minor, Blues, etc...)
    You don't have time to play every mode of every scale everyday

    Practice carefully.. get the most out of your time: go slow and use a metronome.

    Ernest S. Williams has a good book called "The Secret of Technique Preservation" which was designed to cover all the fundamentals every day in 45-60 mins for busy working pros that don't have time to practice.
    Clarke also has a similar book: "Setting Up Drills"
     
  3. bfoster68

    bfoster68 New Friend

    35
    22
    Jun 4, 2013
    Spring Hill
    nice thank you!!!
     
  4. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    I own the Goldman daily skills book too, that might be useful.

    I want to point out that I am a community band player and do not aspire to be much more, so I don't need to work the "hard" scales much, if at all. But I do want to be a good community band player.

    Tom
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,396
    7,510
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Get a hose trumpet and take care of long tones while you drive.
     
  6. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

    2,513
    1,291
    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    That will save alot of time... You can easily do all 12 Major scales in ONE MINUTE. And that's not a frantic pace, nice clean and even. Another 5 mins and you can do all 12 up and down in 3rds. Boom.. Done.

    Maybe run the minor ones now and then though. ;-)

    Practice your explanation for when you get pulled over because the cop thinks you are huffing on a hookah!
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,396
    7,510
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I've already had to explain it wasn't a hookah to a bunch of babes that tried to pick me up. They wanted to party and wanted a hit. You could see the angst on their faces as I explained I'm practicing my hose trumpet! :-) For whatever reason they sped off. :-( :roll:
    Cops never give me a second look.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,954
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    This is exactly what I do. Longtones/IUrons book lipslurs in the morning and the technically tough stuff in the evening.

     
  9. tptCarl

    tptCarl Pianissimo User

    98
    9
    Jan 17, 2006
    Cottonwood, Arizona
    there are no "hard" scales, just scales
     
  10. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    You're completely correct. The repertoire I'm playing almost never goes beyond three sharps or three flats. It was a shock to see a piece with four sharps in it on a recent concert. So, honestly, going beyond that is not an effective use of my time for the pieces I'm playing.

    Yes, I know, a properly-educated trumpet player knows a dozen scales in each key, etc. I never said I was properly educated. :-)

    Tom
     

Share This Page