Two practice sessions per day

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by VetPsychWars, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    What aspect of your technique do you feel needs the most improvement? What do you want to tighten up first? Rather than spreading out your time working a little bit of everything, why not just drill the single aspect of technique you want to improve? You'll wind up benefitting in other ways from it too, and you'll undoubtedly come away from doing that in a different place than you were in just a couple of weeks.

    I'm not saying that this is something that should be continued long term, but rather for 2-3 weeks.
     
  2. 4INer

    4INer Pianissimo User

    99
    52
    Dec 31, 2013
    I like to say there are no difficult scales, just unfamiliar scales...... :)
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    There are definitely scales that require more coordination than others, and it has nothing to do with familiarity. No matter what, they will have to be worked more than others to get them to the same level of proficiency.
     
  4. 4INer

    4INer Pianissimo User

    99
    52
    Dec 31, 2013
    Coordination (fine motor skills, gross motor skills, etc.) is what you get through repetition of said action. In other words by familiarizing yourself with the task. Hence it has everything to do with familiarity.... Yes we all have certain fingering patterns that are more challenging and hence require more work to make them familiar to us....... If we all started by playing C# major, and if most of our music was in C# major, we may find that C major, or F major would be the key we feel uncoordinated when playing.....
     
  5. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Believe what you want, but when you factor in the inherent weakness of the 3rd finger due to its attachment to the 4th, there are certain combinations of valves that simply do not, nor will they ever, roll off of the fingers as easily as others, no matter what you may have learned first, or how familiar you get with it. The best a player can hope for is to work hard enough to make the difficult combinations flow as well as the easy ones do naturally.
     
  6. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

    3,139
    1,603
    Jan 9, 2010
    East Yorkshire
    I would only add one thing somewhere in your practice time make some music, it is very easy to get lost in a mire of technical studies and exercises and forget that the ultimate goal in to play a piece or pieces. Choose a piece that you can play very musically and concentrate on every note to make it the best note you have ever played.
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,391
    7,506
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Well, I don't put my pinky in the "octave ring" until needed. Having played and still play in a church "praise/rock/worship" band for the last 9 years, I've become very proficient in all the "bad" keys that use the 3rd finger a lot. It really is a familiarity thing for me. Hours and hours of B,C#, and F# major scales do the trick ;-) Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition...
     
  8. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

    3,751
    2,152
    Nov 8, 2006
    Greenfield WI
    To reply to a few of your questions...

    There is no one specific thing I need work on, I basically have to work all of the fundamentals to overall improve. I do not plan to work on fundamentals/technicals exclusively; I will also practice my parts for community band. I do want to say that the primary weakness right now is... weakness! I need more time on the horn to build more endurance. I am not generally able to finish a two-hour rehearsal playing the same as I did at the beginning.

    Thanks!

    Tom
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    I don't see that as anything abnormal - we get taxed when we play, or at least I do. Even back in my early 20s as an Army bandsman, I'd be pretty much blown out by the end of a rehearsal. During the off season our days would look something like:

    9:00-11:30 - Concert Band rehearsal (one break in the middle)
    11:30-1:00 lunch
    1:00-3:30 - Big Band (one break in the middle)

    Concert band had good days and bad days, but the 90 minute break for lunch was a nice little recuperation period. Then came big band at 1:00. By the time we hit the end of big band, I was pretty spent, although there did come a time when it wasn't my chops that were getting taxed - it was my wind machine.

    In any case though, I was never playing quite the same at the end of rehearsals as I was in the beginning. It sounds to me like work on the basics - long tones, articulation and basic flexibilities are what would take you the furthest the fastest. I know that others are suggesting that you also spend time on the music, but unless you actually need to learn a part to get it under your fingers, your time would be better spent (IMO) working the basics. Once your fundamentals start to tighten up, playing music becomes a lot easier because you can focus more on the music and less on what's going on between you and the horn.
     
  10. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

    5,331
    4,731
    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    The routine I've fallen into is

    19/30 longtones
    All 12 scales legato, then tongued then double-tongued, in all 7 modes
    Simple lip slurs gradually increasing intervals from 3rds through to octaves

    With breaks, that's a pretty solid 40 minute session that seems to work for where I'm currently at, whether it's standalone daily maintenance (busy workdays) or preparation for a longer practice session
     

Share This Page